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Edit

The only part that I would still like a solution for is getting the spheres to look spherical. If I scale the axis the same, the spheres are too small but spherical. Is there a way to then clip the unused portion off so it is zoomed in? Or can we need set the axis so big and get the desired effect?

End Edit

From plotting a sphere in python, I was able to two add a spheres to my plot.

However, I can't get them to look spherical no matter how I adjust the parameters. Additionally, adding 'g' or any other color to the end of there plots doesn't change there color.

I also tried color='g' but that didn't work either.

How can I get a spherical look (ax autoscale) and change the color?

#!/usr/bin/env python                                                             
#  This porgram numerically solves the trajectory from the Earth to the moon      
#  with the specified flight path, true anomaly, and initial conditions.          

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from numpy import linspace

me = 5.974 * 10 ** (24)  #  mass of the earth                                     
mm = 7.348 * 10 ** (22)  #  mass of the moon                                      
G = 6.67259 * 10 ** (-20)  #  gravitational parameter                             
re = 6378.0  #  radius of the earth in km                                         
rm = 1737.0  #  radius of the moon in km                                          
r12 = 384400.0  #  distance between the CoM of the earth and moon                 
M = me + mm

pi1 = me / M
pi2 = mm / M
mue = 398600.0  #  gravitational parameter of earth km^3/sec^2                    
mum = G * mm  #  grav param of the moon                                           
mu = mue + mum
omega = np.sqrt(mu / r12 ** 3)
nu = -134.979 * np.pi / 180  #  true anomaly angle in radian                      

x = 327156.0 - 4671
#  x location where the moon's SOI effects the spacecraft with the offset of the  
#  Earth not being at (0,0) in the Earth-Moon system                              
y = 33050.0   #  y location                                                       

vbo = 10.85  #  velocity at burnout                                               

gamma = 0 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians of the flight path                   

vx = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.cos(nu) - np.cos(gamma) * np.sin(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the x direction                                          
vy = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.sin(nu) + np.cos(gamma) * np.cos(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the y direction                                          

xrel = (re + 300.0) * np.cos(nu) - pi2 * r12
yrel = (re + 300.0) * np.sin(nu)

#  r0 = [xrel, yrel, 0]                                                           
#  v0 = [vx, vy, 0]                                                               
u0 = [xrel, yrel, 0, vx, vy, 0]


def deriv(u, dt):
    n1 = -((mue * (u[0] + pi2 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2
                                               + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * (u[0] - pi1 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2
                                              + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    n2 = -((mue * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    return [u[3],  #  dotu[0] = u[3]                                              
            u[4],  #  dotu[1] = u[4]                                              
            u[5],  #  dotu[2] = u[5]                                              
            2 * omega * u[4] + omega ** 2 * u[0] + n1,  #  dotu[3] = that         
            omega ** 2 * u[1] - 2 * omega * u[3] + n2,  #  dotu[4] = that         
            0]  #  dotu[5] = 0                                                    


dt = np.linspace(0.0, 320000.0, 1000000.0)  #  200000 secs to run the simulation  
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z)
#  adding the moon                                                                
phi = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100)
theta = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)
xm = rm * np.outer(np.cos(phi), np.sin(theta)) + r12
ym = rm * np.outer(np.sin(phi), np.sin(theta))
zm = rm * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(phi)), np.cos(theta))
ax.plot_surface(xm, ym, zm)
ax.auto_scale_xyz([-50000, 400000], [0, 160000], [-130000, 130000])
#  adding the earth                                                               
xe = re * np.outer(np.cos(phi), np.sin(theta)) - 4671
ye = re * np.outer(np.sin(phi), np.sin(theta))
ze = re * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(phi)), np.cos(theta))
ax.plot_surface(xe, ye, ze, 'g')
ax.auto_scale_xyz([-50000, 400000], [0, 160000], [-130000, 130000])
#                                                                                 
plt.show()
#  The code below finds the distance between path and the moon                    
my_x, my_y, my_z = (384400,0,0)

delta_x = x - my_x
delta_y = y - my_y
delta_z = z - my_z
distance = np.array([np.sqrt(delta_x ** 2 + delta_y ** 2 + delta_z ** 2)])

minimum = np.amin(distance)

print(minimum)
share|improve this question
1  
I didn't post this as a solution because I couldn't ge the things to look spherical, but to get coloring you need to do the following. ax.plot_surface(xe, ye, ze, color='green', linewidth=0). The trick is setting linewidth=0 because otherwise matplotlib tries to draw lines that are so thick that they run on top of each other and make the whole surface look black. – spencerlyon2 Apr 24 '13 at 4:05
1  
To get the earth and moon to look spherical you need to have the bounds (scales) on the x, y, and z axis all the same. I tried this ax.auto_scale_xyz([-50000, 400000], [-50000, 400000], [-50000, 400000]) and it worked, but it gave a lot of wasted space. Also, with setting the scales you only need to do that once for the whole axis. I would remove the one after adding the moon and only leave the one with the earth and it will work fine. – spencerlyon2 Apr 24 '13 at 4:08
    
@spencerlyon2 I just noticed that and was about to amend my op – dustin Apr 24 '13 at 4:09
    
@spencerlyon2 is there a way to clip away the extra space so python will make the spheres circular still? – dustin Apr 24 '13 at 4:12
    
Not that I know of off hand, but I will keep checking. – spencerlyon2 Apr 24 '13 at 4:30

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