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Given an following files in the Documents directory --

Animals/Birds/file1.xyz
Animals/Birds/file2.xyz
Animals/Cats/file1.xyz
Cars/Ford/file1.xyz
Photos/MyAlbums/file1.xyz

And given that we have an NSArray of NSURLs to these files, is it possible to use an NSPredicate to filter the array by path or path/subpath? For example

  • Unique names of everything in the first level of the hierarchy (Animals, Cars, Photos)
  • Unique names of everything in the second level (Birds, Cats)
  • Files in the Animals directory -- (/Animals)
  • Files in the Cats directory -- (/Animals/Cats)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since these are actual file URLs in the actual Documents directory, why not use NSFileManager contentsOfDirectoryAtURL:? It directly answers the question you are asking ("files in the Cats directory").

Or, for more power, cycle through the files with an NSDirectoryEnumerator.

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Mostly for performance reasons. The array is part of a UICollectionViewDataDource which switches (via pinch) between showing the various levels. I could simply iterate through the first level and wait for a pinch gesture to determine what's in the second level -- but there are an unknown number of files or directories. Since using an NSPredicate to filter an array is fairly lightweight, my thought was to grab all the files at the beginning and filter the list when the collection view needs counts and objects from a particular level in the hierarchy. –  Michael G. Emmons Apr 24 '13 at 13:59
    
Or perhaps a better question might have been what's the most performant approach to use if you want to display various levels of a directory structure in UICollectionView. –  Michael G. Emmons Apr 24 '13 at 14:23
    
You're just making me repeat myself. Have you any actual reason to doubt that contentsOfDirectoryAtURL: is "performant"? It directly answers the question, instantly. Alternatively, you should have started with a more appropriate data structure, one from which you could extract this information instantly - something hierarchical and random-access. As it stands, the file system is hierarchical and random-access, and will do better than your flat array. –  matt Apr 24 '13 at 16:32

If you really wanted to filter an array of NSURLs you could do something like this:

- (NSArray *)filteredArray:(NSArray *)originalArray withSubpath:(NSString *)subpath {
    NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithBlock:^BOOL(id evaluatedObject, NSDictionary *bindings) {
        NSURL *url = (NSURL *)evaluatedObject;
        NSRange range = [[url path] rangeOfString:subpath];
        return (range.location == 0);
    }];
    return [originalArray filteredArrayUsingPredicate:predicate];
}

Here's how I tested it:

NSArray *urls = @[[NSURL URLWithString:@"Animals/Birds/file1.xyz"],
                  [NSURL URLWithString:@"Animals/Birds/file2.xyz"],
                  [NSURL URLWithString:@"Animals/Cats/file1.xyz"],
                  [NSURL URLWithString:@"Cars/Ford/file1.xyz"]];

NSLog(@"Before: %@", urls);
urls = [self filteredArray:urls withSubpath:@"Animals/Birds"];
NSLog(@"After: %@", urls);

The output log was:

Before: (
    "Animals/Birds/file1.xyz",
    "Animals/Birds/file2.xyz",
    "Animals/Cats/file1.xyz",
    "Cars/Ford/file1.xyz"
)
After: (
    "Animals/Birds/file1.xyz",
    "Animals/Birds/file2.xyz"
)

Note: It matches substrings, so it wouldn't match "/Animals" in this case because of the leading slash (unless both the array and the substring included the '/').

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