Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a data structure to keep synonyms. I'd like "Washington D.C.", "Washington DC" or "Washington D.C" to all associate to "Washington". Something like a List => Value structure.

I have a service that sends an email to users if their city in mentioned on a specific website. When they register they enter their email and city. However some people will enter "Washington" and some others "Washington D.C.". Now I want these to be in the same "bucket" and send all of these people an email if "Washington D.C" or "Washington" is mentioned on the website.

share|improve this question
1  
Hashes in Ruby allow any type of object as the key, including Arrays, so your "Something like an Array => Value" is entirely possible. Whether that's actually a useful structure depends entirely on how you intend to use it, which isn't clear. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 24 '13 at 4:59
    
What are your requirements? Low memory? Fast lookup? Access from any synonym to the others? What have you tried? What problems are you having with your attempts? -1 for what appears to be an ill-specified and lazy question. –  Phrogz Apr 24 '13 at 5:00
    
I have a service that sends an email to users if their city in mentioned on a specific website. When they register they enter their email and city. However some people will enter "Washington" and some others "Washington D.C.". Now I want these to be in the same "bucket" and send all of these people an email if "Washington D.C" or "Washington" is mentioned on the website. –  Chris911 Apr 24 '13 at 5:05

3 Answers 3

class Synonyms
  def initialize( *syns )
    @all = []
    @idx = {}
    syns.each{ |syn| self << syn }
  end
  def <<( syn )
    p syn
    unless @idx.include?(syn)
      @all << syn
      @idx[syn] = @all  
    end
  end
  def []( syn )
    @idx[syn]
  end
end

wash = Synonyms.new "Washington DC", "Washington", "Washington D.C."

p wash["Washington"]    #=> ["Washington DC", "Washington", "Washington D.C."]
p wash["Washington DC"] #=> ["Washington DC", "Washington", "Washington D.C."]
p wash["Nope"]          #=> nil

Next, create a hash mapping each known synonym to its list, or loop through them, or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess this could work if the first element is always the "master" element which is what I'm looking for. Thanks –  Chris911 Apr 24 '13 at 5:11
    
Nice representation! Learned a lots from your code. :) –  Arup Rakshit Apr 24 '13 at 7:17

I would recommend using a hash of lists.

For example:

synonyms = {"Washington" => ["Washington D.C.", "Washington DC", "Washington D.C"], ...}

Then you get the benefit of the quick lookup time of a hashtable and you can iterate the items and perform list operations on them.

UPDATE

It sounds like what you want is still a hash. What you need to do, however, is associate any given member of a list of synonyms with a list of all other synonyms.

You could build a simple function to do this, for example:

def associate_synonyms(synonyms, syn_hash)
  synonyms.length.times do

    synonym = synonyms.pop

    p synonyms

    syn_hash[synonym] = synonyms.collect {|x| x}
    synonyms.insert(0, synonym)
  end
end

So, for example usage:

place = ["Washington", "Washington D.C.", "Washington DC", "Washington D.C"]
synonym_lookup = {}

associate_synonyms(place, synonym_lookup)
share|improve this answer
    
Great if the OP wants to see the synonyms for "Washington". Poor if the OP wants to see what "Washington DC" is synonymous with. This is one answer to a very underspecified question. –  Phrogz Apr 24 '13 at 5:01
    
Sorry wasn't sure how to specify the question. What I want is actually what @Phrogz mentioned. I'd like to know what "Washington DC" is synonymous with. –  Chris911 Apr 24 '13 at 5:03
    
Updated, is this more like what you are asking? –  mjgpy3 Apr 24 '13 at 5:18

Based on your clarified needs, the simplest solution would probably be a simple Hash, where each possible synonym simply points to the canonical city name:

city_name_map = {"Washington D.C." => "Washington",
                 "Washington DC"   => "Washington",
                 "Washington D.C"  => "Washington",
                 "Washington"      => "Washington",
                 # and so forth
                }

When people sign up with "Washington D.C.", their city preference in the database is stored as the value of city_name_map["Washington D.C."], which is "Washington". Similarly when searching pages for city mentions, just check the map for the canonical name of the city. If a website mentions "Washington DC", you look it up and get "Washington", and then contact people whose canonical city preference matches.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that's the easiest solution. Thanks –  Chris911 Apr 24 '13 at 5:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.