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I am making a music player where we have stations. I have a table called histories. It has data on the songs a user likes, dislikes or skipped. We store all the times that a person has liked a song or disliked it. We want to get a current snapshot of all the songs the user has either liked (event_type=1) or disliked (event_type=2) in a given station.

The table has the following rows:

  • id (PK int autoincrement)
  • station_id (FK int)
  • song_id (FK int)
  • event_type (int, either 1, 2, or 3)

Here is my query:

SELECT song_id, event_type, id 
FROM histories 
WHERE id IN (SELECT MAX(id) AS id 
             FROM histories 
             WHERE station_id = 187 
               AND (event_type=1 OR event_type=2) 
             GROUP BY station_id, song_id)  
ORDER BY id;

Is there a way to make this query run without the inner select? I am pretty sure this will run a lot faster without it

share|improve this question
    
If this is MySQL, show us what putting EXPLAIN in front of the rest of your query will produce. Any query that's not pulling from an indexed or key column will slow it down. –  Makoto Apr 24 '13 at 6:37
    
why are you pretty sure? have you examined the query plan and found out what is wrong with it, and is it really about the inner select or something else? –  eis Apr 24 '13 at 6:37
    
a simple query seems to be enigh as described SELECT song_id, event_type, id FROM histories WHERE station_id = 187 AND (event_type=1 OR event_type=2) ORDER BY id; –  Rab Nawaz Apr 24 '13 at 6:42
    
If this is in SQL 2012 or Oracle 11g you can use analytical functions to speed it up. But I see you already have an answer. –  Nick.McDermaid Apr 24 '13 at 8:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use JOIN instead. Something like this:

SELECT h1.song_id, h1.event_type, h1.id 
FROM histories AS h1
INNER JOIN
(
   SELECT station_id, song_id, MAX(id) AS MaxId
   FROM histories 
   WHERE station_id = 187 
     AND event_type IN (1, 2) 
   GROUP BY station_id, song_id
)  AS h2  ON h1.station_id = h2.station_id 
         AND h1.song_id    = h2.song_id
         AND h1.id         = h2.maxid
ORDER BY h1.id;
share|improve this answer
    
id is a PK. No other columns are necessary in the derived table (aka "subquery"). Alternative this is, but faster than the original - not. –  RichardTheKiwi Apr 24 '13 at 6:52
    
are you sure this isn't faster? it seems to be working –  jamesatha Apr 24 '13 at 6:57
    
sorry, can you explain why this isn't faster? (because it is much faster from what I'm seeing) –  jamesatha Apr 24 '13 at 7:11
    
@jamesatha - I am not sure. But, this might be faster than the original one because of the INNER JOIN instead of the IN predicate. –  Mahmoud Gamal Apr 24 '13 at 7:20
    
is the IN predicate better than the OR's? –  jamesatha Apr 24 '13 at 20:44

@Mahmoud Gamal answer is correct, you probably can get rid of the some conditions that is not needed.

SELECT h1.song_id, h1.event_type, h1.id 
FROM histories AS h1
INNER JOIN
(
   SELECT MAX(id) AS MaxId
   FROM histories 
   WHERE station_id = 187 
     AND event_type IN (1, 2) 
   GROUP BY song_id
)  AS h2  ON h1.id = h2.maxid
ORDER BY h1.id;
share|improve this answer

Based on your description, this is the answer:

SELECT DISTINCT song_id, event_type, id 
FROM histories 
WHERE station_id = 187 
AND (event_type=1 OR event_type=2) 
ORDER BY id

But you must be doing the MAX for some reason - why?

share|improve this answer
    
We need the MAX since i want the current snapshot. If a song is liked and later disliked in the station, the latest one (with the highest id value) needs to be the one we return –  jamesatha Apr 24 '13 at 6:40

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