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I would like to assign a value to a const QList depending on the value of a pointer.

invar is a pointer, if it is NULL I want to assign a first value to const QList mylist, if it is not NULL, another value. But const correctness is observed: i do not intend to change value for mylist afterwards.

Is it possible to have

if(invar)
    const QList<Type> zoneList = invar->getZones();
else
    const QList<Type> zoneList = aList ;

I am defining zoneList once exactly, so why would this not be working ?

ALso, as I am using zoneList in the next part of my method, I get this compile error: undeclared identifier.

But I am not allowed to write that either

    const QList<Type> zoneList ;

    if(invar)
        zoneList = invar->getZones();
    else
        zoneList = NULL ;

and I have compiler error Error 1

error C2678: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const QList<T>' (or there is no acceptable conversion)  

Is it possible to have two different values assigned to this const QList depending on a condition ? What is the right way to write it then ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use the ternary operator ?:

const QList<Type> zoneList(invar ? invar->getZones() : aList);

BTW is it NULL or is it aList? You have both in your code above.

This

if(invar)
    const QList<Type> zoneList = invar->getZones();
else
    const QList<Type> zoneList = aList ;

doesn't work because each zoneList variable is defined inside the if statement only.

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With such a simple condition, you could just use the ternary operator:

const QList<Type> zoneList = invar ? invar->getZones() : aList;

If the initialization gets more complex than that and you happen to use C++11, then you can use a new idiom made possible by lambdas:

const QList<Type> zoneList = [] () -> QList<Type> {
                          // ^^ possibly [&] to capture variables

        // some complex stuff that returns a QList<Type>

    }(); // Note the () that calls the lambda immediately

If you are stuck with C++03 (or, Stroustrup forbid, C++98), there are few solutions left except calling another function/method, with the drawback that you have to pass as a parameter any local variable you need to compute the const value.


Edit: I realize I haven't fully answered your question. Others have already explained that your first if can't work because it's a matter of scope, I won't add much except that adding braces will probably make it clearer for you (note how this is strictly the same code as yours: the braces are optional when the if/else bodies are just a single statement but their presence/absence doesn't change the semantics of the code):

if (invar) {
    const QList<Type> zoneList = invar->getZones();
}
else {
    const QList<Type> zoneList = aList;
}
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Nice use case of a lambda. –  leemes Apr 24 '13 at 7:25
    
@leemes: Yeah I discovered it not long ago (on H.Sutter's blog I believe) and it struck me as a very nice solution to that old problem. Since then, I try to spread it whenever the topic arises. ;) –  syam Apr 24 '13 at 7:28
    
Actually in our current project at work, we use a lot const smart pointers, but when creating a new object and setting attributes on that, it should not (yet) be const, yet we have to return a const pointer or continue some next step with a const pointer. Our current "nicest-we-can-get" solution is to first keep the pointer non-const and non-smart and "wrap" it only in the return statement / as soon as it should be const. It will make a nice improvement when I integrate your solution in such cases. Thanks! –  leemes Apr 24 '13 at 7:32

If you do

if(invar)
    const QList<Type> zoneList = invar->getZones();
else
    const QList<Type> zoneList = aList ;

the scope of zoneList is limited to the if or else branch, and outside it does not exist anymore.
And if you do

const QList<Type> zoneList ;

if(invar)
    zoneList = invar->getZones();
else
    zoneList = NULL ;

zoneList is declared const and cannot be changed in if/else.

For a hack you could use const_cast, but it is bad practice so you must initialize zoneList.

zoneList = invar != 0 ? invar->getZones() : 0; //don't use NULL in C++
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