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I have a code

var i = 0;
_searchService.FindAll().SubscribeOn(NewThreadScheduler.Default).Subscribe(i =>
                                       {
                                           i++
                                       }, () =>
                                          {
                                             i*=2; });

As far as I know applying .SubscribeOn(NewThreadScheduler.Default) make IObserver run in new thread. All works well but I have problem with unit tests.

I make neccessary changes but this subscription running in another thrad doesn't wait. How to cancel .SubscribeOn(NewThreadScheduler.Default) for unit tests. Code works well without this appointment.

I've tried reactive UI testScheduler.With((scheduler)=>{... write this code here...}); but there is no success. How can I solve this problem?

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If you are using RxUI could you try using RxApp.TaskpoolScheduler instead of NewThreadScheduler.Default and see if that helps? –  Dtex Apr 24 '13 at 13:18
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3 Answers

You will want to use a TestScheduler in place of the NewThreadScheduler for your unit tests. I assume that you are using IoC as a design pattern to enable your unit testing, so then all you need to do is create an ISchedulerProvider/ISchedulerService/... interface that exposes what you need. This is something that I use

public interface ISchedulerProvider
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Provides access to scheduling onto the UI Dispatcher. 
    /// </summary>
    IScheduler Dispatcher { get; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides concurrent scheduling. Will use the thread pool or the task pool if available.
    /// </summary>
    IScheduler Concurrent { get; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides concurrent scheduling for starting long running tasks. Will use a new thread or a long running task if available. Can be used to run loops more efficiently than using recursive scheduling.
    /// </summary>
    ISchedulerLongRunning LongRunning { get; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides support for scheduling periodic tasks. Can be used to run timers more efficiently than using recursive scheduling.
    /// </summary>
    ISchedulerPeriodic Periodic { get; }
}

public sealed class SchedulerProvider : ISchedulerProvider
{
    private readonly IScheduler _dispatcherScheduler;

    public SchedulerProvider()
    {
        var currentDispatcher = System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;
        _dispatcherScheduler = new DispatcherScheduler(currentDispatcher);
    }

    public IScheduler Dispatcher
    {
        get { return _dispatcherScheduler; }
    }


    public IScheduler Concurrent
    {
        get { return TaskPoolScheduler.Default; }
    }

    public ISchedulerLongRunning LongRunning
    {
        get { return TaskPoolScheduler.Default.AsLongRunning(); }
    }

    public ISchedulerPeriodic Periodic
    {
        get { return TaskPoolScheduler.Default.AsPeriodic(); }
    }
}

Then in your tests, you would use an implementation that returns TestScheduler implementations instead.

public sealed class TestSchedulerProvider : ISchedulerProvider
{
    private readonly TestScheduler _dispatcher = new TestScheduler();
    private readonly TestScheduler _concurrent = new TestScheduler();
    private readonly TestScheduler _longRunning = new TestScheduler();
    private readonly TestScheduler _periodic = new TestScheduler();


    IScheduler ISchedulerProvider.Dispatcher
    {
        get { return _dispatcher; }
    }
    public TestScheduler Dispatcher
    {
        get { return _dispatcher; }
    }

    IScheduler ISchedulerProvider.Concurrent
    {
        get { return _concurrent; }
    }
    public TestScheduler Concurrent
    {
        get { return _concurrent; }
    }

    ISchedulerLongRunning ISchedulerProvider.LongRunning
    {
        get { return _longRunning.AsLongRunning(); }
    }
    public TestScheduler LongRunning
    {
        get { return _longRunning; }
    }

    ISchedulerPeriodic ISchedulerProvider.Periodic
    {
        get { return _periodic.AsPeriodic(); }
    }
    public TestScheduler Periodic
    {
        get { return _periodic; }
    }
}

As you can see this is aimed at a WPF project, but you can just change it (removing or adding) as you see fit.

I have tried to explain in detail how to test Rx with the TestScheduler on my site here http://introtorx.com/Content/v1.0.10621.0/16_TestingRx.html

I don't really understand what you example code is doing but I would think you perhaps want to update it to

var testScheduler = new TestScheduler();
var i = 0;
var subscription = _searchService
              .FindAll()
              .SubscribeOn(testScheduler)
              .Subscribe(
                 i =>i++, 
                 () => i*=2);
Assert.AreEqual(0, i);
testScheduler.AdvanceBy(1);
Assert.AreEqual(1, i);
subscription.Dispose();
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Scheduler.With(block => .... only works if your code always uses RxApp.TaskPoolScheduler or RxApp.DeferredScheduler (for the UI Thread). If you change your NewThreadScheduler.Default to RxApp.TaskPoolScheduler, it should work as you expect.

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I have solved this same problem by creating a NuGet package which implements an approach similar to the ISchedulerProvider suggested by @Lee Campbell. It consists of a "switch" class which I use as a replacement for the Scheduler class. For convenience, I have published it as a NuGet package at https://nuget.org/packages/RxSchedulers.Switch/.

To use it adapt your code as follows:

var i = 0;
_searchService.FindAll()
              .SubscribeOn(SchedulerSwitch.GetNewThreadScheduler())
              .Subscribe(i =>
                             {
                                i++
                             }, () =>
                             {
                                i*=2; });

By default the SchedulerSwitch lambdas map to the respective runtime schedulers. However, when setting up your test context, you can replace the runtime scheduler by the one of your choice (for instance, a TestScheduler or the ImmediateScheduler):

testScheduler = new TestScheduler();
SchedulerSwitch.GetNewThreadScheduler = () => testScheduler;
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Just a point here that your SchedulerSwitch seems to be a Static class. This sounds like it will end in tears. You wont be able to run any unit tests in parallel, and you wont ever really know that state of the static object that you are using. This is why people use interfaces and IoC/DI. –  Lee Campbell Apr 25 '13 at 18:08
    
Nah, you just have to be a bit more clever about defining the property: github.com/reactiveui/ReactiveUI/blob/rxui5-master/ReactiveUI/… –  Paul Betts Apr 25 '13 at 19:29
    
Good point @LeeCampbell, and funny because the solution that immediately came to mind was the one proposed by Paul Betts. –  Pedro Pombeiro Apr 27 '13 at 12:14
    
In fact, since SchedulerSwitch just defines a Func<IScheduler>, it is up to the user of the class to define his field as ThreadStatic. –  Pedro Pombeiro Apr 28 '13 at 13:33
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