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The python doc says:

If we make the string literal a “raw” string, \n sequences are not converted to newlines, but the backslash at the end of the line, and the newline character in the source, are both included in the string as data. Thus, the example:

I do not quite understand, as it says the newline character in the source is inclued in the string as data, but the \n just be printed literally as in the following example.

hello = r"This is a rather long string containing\n\
several lines of text much as you would do in C."

print(hello)

Can any kind helper help me understand but the backslash at the end of the line, and the newline character in the source, are both included in the string as data?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You included both the \n (two characters) and a newline in the string:

>>> hello
'This is a rather long string containing\\n\\\nseveral lines of text much as you would do in C.'

Reduce it to just the \n\ part (with a newline after the second slash:

>>> hello = r'\n\
... '
>>> hello
'\\n\\\n'
>>> len(hello)
4
>>> list(hello)
['\\', 'n', '\\', '\n']

There are 4 characters there. A backslash (doubled in the representation to make it a valid Python string), an n, another backslash, and a newline.

You can break it down further; the backslash before the literal newline in the source creates a string with both a backslash and a newline:

>>> hello = r'\
... '
>>> hello
'\\\n'
>>> len(hello)
2
>>> list(hello)
['\\', '\n']

The raw literal r'\n' on the other hand creates a backslash and the literal character n:

>>> hello = r'\n'
>>> hello
'\\n'
>>> len(hello)
2
>>> list(hello)
['\\', 'n']
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