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I have a map<int, map<int, queue<string>> which holds client messages - the first map holds message category (1-7), the second holds the ID of the source client ('0s of clients) and the queue holds the message itself.

Messages will be pushed into the queues as they are received:

map<int, map<int, queue<string>>> msg_map; //map holding messages
//receive message from client
int msg = receive_fr_client(cli_id); //function to receive message from client
int msg_category = cat_check(msg); //function to process message attribute

msg_map[msg_category][cli_id].push(msg);

I need to be able to iterate over this nested map in order to check if the queues are empty - essentially, I need to know which clients in the highest category have a message to send. After that, I will pick one client (through another algo, but irrelevant here so I'm picking one randomly) to process a message from.

I have conceptualized the following: is there a better way to do it? I am working in VS2012, and I would like to stay away from boost if possible.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <queue>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int, map<int, queue<int>>> msg_map;
    msg_map[2][3].push(3);
    msg_map[3][4].push(5);
    msg_map[3][4].push(7);
    msg_map[3][7].push(9);
    msg_map[3][11].push(11);

    int count = 1;
    int rand_cli;

    for (int i=7; i>0 && count > 0 ; i--)
    {
        if (msg_map.find(i) != msg_map.end())
        {
            map<int, queue<int>>::iterator iter;
            vector<int> cli_index;

            for (iter = msg_map[i].begin(); iter != msg_map[i].end(); iter++)
            {
                if (!iter->second.empty())
                {
                    cli_index.push_back(iter->first);
                }
            }

            int index_size = cli_index.size();
            int rand_pos = rand() % index_size;
            rand_cli = cli_index[rand_pos];

            count--;
        }
    }

    cout << rand_cli;



    return 0;
}
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2  
map<> is very unlikely to provide any added performance over vector if your range is [1, 7]. using a vector< map<int, queue<string> > > will simplify your algorithms & most likely will improve performance. –  indeterminately sequenced Apr 24 '13 at 7:40
    
@indeterminatelysequenced I think "most likely" can be safely removed from that last sentence. Since we know the ordinal min/max, this doesn't even need a vector: map<int, queue<string>> msgs[7]; I'm quite confident that would out-perform any map conceivable. –  WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 8:18

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