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I want to know if there is any pattern that can overcome this problem: I have a set of properties that needed to be public to several classes and to other classes they should be only readonly, the classes must be public.

I do not want to use reflection or any other bad performance makers.

I know I can make them RO and implement logic inside class but I don't think it's good.

Any help?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two options:

  1. Make the property internal (not the class) and group the classes into different assemblies.
  2. Use reflection magic.

Sadly, there are no friend classes in C#.

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Inside the current assembly, you can make it internal.

Outside the current assembly, the best you can do is make it available to specific assemblies, via [InternalsVisibleTo].

.NET does not offer more granular "friend" access.

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4  
I think this should be considered an anti-pattern. –  Johannes Rudolph Oct 24 '09 at 17:51
1  
I agree with Johannes. Actually, I think you have a design problem if you want to have different member accessibility for different callers. .NET lackes finer granulatet friends for good. –  Maximilian Mayerl Oct 24 '09 at 17:55
1  
Very valid points; indeed, I generally only use [InternalsVisibleTo] for unit tests. –  Marc Gravell Oct 24 '09 at 17:59
1  
@Johannes -- I disagree. I can think of several good reasons to do this, though I'd typically restrict use of InternalsVisibleTo only to test assemblies. It allows the use of factories (in the same assembly) to access property settors while retaining the readonly nature of the a property, it's almost required when doing integration work against the DB of an application to add functionality safely by rigidly defining the types of interactions that can take place outside the data layer within designer generated classes. –  tvanfosson Oct 24 '09 at 18:08
1  
We do many things for unit tests we wouldn't do for production code, do we? (think of all the reflection etc.) I consider [InternalsVisibleTo] to be fine for unit tests. That why I didn't downvote. –  Johannes Rudolph Oct 24 '09 at 20:31
class Person : IReadOnlyPerson {
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IReadOnlyPerson {
    string Name { get; }
}

To those classes that should do r/o access - use IReadOlyPerson

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That's a good one. –  devoured elysium Apr 25 '10 at 16:56

You could try declaring your setters as protected in your base class. Any class that derives it will be able to set it. But any class using the derived class will only see a read-only property.

public class ClassBase
{
    public int MyProperty
    {
        get;
        protected set;
    }
}

public sealed class ClassDerived : ClassBase
{
    public ClassDerived()
    {
        MyProperty = 4; // will set
    }
}

public class ClassUsingDerived
{
    public ClassUsingDerived()
    {
        ClassDerived drv = new ClassDerived();
        drv.MyProperty = 5; // will fail
    }
}

That is if i understand the question correctly :)

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That only works if the class in question is a derivative. What happens when the consumer is not a derivative? I think that's his real problem. –  Mike Hofer Oct 24 '09 at 18:01

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