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I want to make a conditional statement that will check if:

comment.user.name

(which may return something like "Montgomery Philips Ridiculouslylonglastname") contains any words with greater than 15 characters.

Something like:

if comment.user.name.split(" ").???
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about this?

comment.user.name.split.any? { |x| x.length > 20 }

Here is the wonderful enumerable mixin documentation for it.

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2  
Should it just be split instead of split('.')? –  Mischa Apr 24 '13 at 7:46
    
@Mischa Well, I thought his original string had . on it to split on. I could be wrong. –  squiguy Apr 24 '13 at 7:46
    
Quote from question: (which may return something like "Montgomery Philips Ridiculouslylonglastname") –  Mischa Apr 24 '13 at 7:47
    
@Mischa Fair, updated. –  squiguy Apr 24 '13 at 7:48
1  
create a whole new array just to check if a string contains long words isn't the best IMHO :-) –  mdesantis Apr 24 '13 at 7:51

Just FYI (as you have already found an appropriate answer), doing it with a regex:

/\b[a-z]{15,}\b/i

If you find a match, there's a word longer than 15 characters (20 in the title).

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thanks for the regex method sry for the 15/20 mix up –  Jaqx Apr 24 '13 at 7:55

Using regexps is cleaner than creating a whole new array just to check if a string matches some pattern (regexps were made for this!):

('a'*19+' '+'a'*19) =~ /[^ ]{20}/ #=> nil
('a'*19+' '+'a'*20) =~ /[^ ]{20}/ #=> 20

This is what I mean:

$ ruby -rbenchmark -e 'long_string = ([("a"*20)]*1000).join(" ")
puts Benchmark.measure{ 100.times{ long_string.split.any? { |x| x.length > 20 } }  }'
#=>   0.050000   0.000000   0.050000 (  0.051955)
$ ruby -rbenchmark -e 'long_string = ([("a"*20)]*1000).join(" ")
puts Benchmark.measure{ 100.times{ long_string  =~ /[^ ]{20}/ }  }'
#=>   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000128)

And the regexp version is ~ 365 times faster than the string.split.any? one!

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\S is not quite it I think. There's a difference between a non-space char and a word char. –  pguardiario Apr 24 '13 at 10:21
    
@pguardiario you're right; the matching pattern closest to split(' ') probably is [^ ] (which is also faster than \S) (answer updated) –  mdesantis Apr 24 '13 at 12:21
def contains_longer_than length
  comment.user.name.split.select{|x| x.length > length}.size > 0
end
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w = "Montgomery Philips Ridiculouslylonglastname" 
w.split().any? {|i| i[16] != nil} #=> true

"Montgomery Philips".split().any? {|i| i[16] != nil} #=> false
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Loamhoof is close but there's a much simpler regex:

/\w{16}/
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