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Problem: I have an entity class (base class), from which I inherit multiple times. Now I have an Add-method and a Validate-method in all of my derived classes. These functions are identical in all derived class and they are static.

Here is my Add-method

public static long Add(DBData[] UserData)
{
    SortedDictionary<string, DBData> Data = new SortedDictionary<string, DBData>();

    foreach (DBData d in UserData)
    {
        Data.Add(d.FieldName, d);
    }

    if (Project.Validate(Data, OperationMode.Add))
    {
        return DBUtility.Insert("Project", VSCommon.Serialise(Data));
    }
    else
    {
        return -1;
    }
}

Now where I have "Project" in above function (2 places, one if object of type Project this function belong too, and other is the database table name). These are the only differences in all my derived classes. I want to put this Add-method in my base class, so I can skip writing it multiple times in every derived class.

I search and found that some try to use generics but I didn't seem to pick it up as when I use generic declaration. When I call the Validate-method a compilation error came by. Also, I need the name of the class as string to get relevant table name.

Not sure I am able to define my problem, any help is appreciated. Thanks.

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Where's your attempt to use generics? What 'compilation error came by'? –  Ant P Apr 24 '13 at 8:26
3  
There's a huge number of principles of object-oriented programming you are violating here. I think trying to answer your specific question will only get you deeper into that procedural mess. –  Dennis Traub Apr 24 '13 at 8:31
    
@Dennis, I agree and I think I am missing conceptual part. But I am not sure. I try to write the ADD method as ADD<T> and then try to use T in place of Project.Validate, but then Compiler ask to Type cast it. I am not sure how to do that? I mean I need my T to be of derived Type, but how I satisfied compiler. –  Sumit Gupta Apr 24 '13 at 8:44

2 Answers 2

You could add a (abstract in base class & virtual) method that returns "Project" for this class and some other string for the other classes. Then just reference that from the static Add method.

I think you could also use reflecion to get the "Project" string, if needed. However I'd advise against doing this, because it adds unnecessary coupling between your database and your code.

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I don't need Project to be returned. Abstract Method are definitely out of question as I do not want to rewrite the Method body, I am already doing that :) and that is what I want to avoid. –  Sumit Gupta Apr 24 '13 at 8:42
    
With such a method you could implement the Add() method in the base class and just call the suggested GetClassName() method instead of writing "Project". –  Simon Apr 24 '13 at 8:43

I solve my issue using following change in ADD Function

public static long Add<T>(DBData[] UserData)
    {
        SortedDictionary<string, DBData> Data = new SortedDictionary<string, DBData>();
        foreach (DBData d in UserData)
        {
            Data.Add(d.FieldName, d);
        }
        MethodInfo m = typeof(T).GetMethod("Validate");
        bool r = (bool)m.Invoke(null, new object[] { Data, OperationMode.Add });
        if (r)
        {
            return DBUtility.Insert(typeof(T).Name, VSCommon.Serialise(Data));
        }
        else
        {
            return -1;
        }
    }

And then I have to change my call to Project.Add<Project>(...); or Client.Add<Client>(...); instead of Project.Add(...) before. But that save lot of trouble for me finally :).

EDIT: I just realize that Project.Add<Client>(...) can also be called and this will insert into Client object. This is not good, so my problem is not actually solved :(.

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