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I have a requirement that says a name must not start with 3 identical letters ignoring their case. A name starts with an upper case letter followed by lower case letters.

Basically I could convert the whole name to upper case and then match with a regex like (\p{Lu})\1{3,}.*.

But I was wondering if there exists a regex that matches the above requirements and does not need any preprocessing of the string to be matched. So what regex can I use to match strings like Aa, Dd or Uu without explicitly specifiying any possible combination?

EDIT:
I accepted Markos answer. I just needed to fix it to work with names of length 1 and two and anchor it at the beginning. So the actual regex for my use case is ^(\p{Lu})(\p{Ll}?$|(?=\p{Ll}{2})(?i)(?!(\1){2})).

I also upvoted the answers of Evgeniy and sp00m for helping me to learn a lesson in regexes.

Thanks for your efforts.

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(?i)(\p{Lu})\1{2,}.* will not do, but wanted to point out 2, as one letter already matched. –  Joop Eggen Apr 24 '13 at 8:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I admit to rising on the shoulders of giants (the other posters here), but this solution actually works for your use case:

final String[] strings = { "Aba", "ABa", "aba", "aBa", "Aaa", "Aab" }; 
final Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(\\p{Lu})(?=\\p{Ll}{2})(?i)(?!(\\1){2})");
for (String s : strings) System.out.println(s + ": " + p.matcher(s).find());

Now we have:

  1. a match for one upcase char at front;
  2. a lookahead assertion of two lowcase chars following;
  3. another lookahead that asserts these two chars are not both the same (ignoring case) as the first one.

Output:

Aba: true
ABa: false
aba: false
aBa: false
Aaa: false
Aab: true
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+1 This should meet all requested requirements (when a .* is added to the end) (I haven't read the question properly), I will not change my solution now, since yours is very similar to what I found now. –  stema Apr 24 '13 at 9:46

try

    String regex = "(?i)(.)(?=\\p{javaLowerCase})(?<=\\p{javaUpperCase})\\1";
    System.out.println("dD".matches(regex));
    System.out.println("dd".matches(regex));
    System.out.println("DD".matches(regex));
    System.out.println("Dd".matches(regex));

output

false
false
false
true
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Looks promising. Also also fails to match strings like Dc. –  SpaceTrucker Apr 24 '13 at 8:52

This matches any uppercased letter followed by the same letter, uppercased or not:

([A-Z])(?i)\1

This matches any uppercased letter followed by the same letter, but necessarily lowercased:

([A-Z])(?!\1)(?i)\1

For example in Java,

String pattern = "([A-Z])(?!\\1)(?i)\\1";
System.out.println("AA".matches(pattern));
System.out.println("aa".matches(pattern));
System.out.println("aA".matches(pattern));
System.out.println("Aa".matches(pattern));

Prints

false
false
false
true
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Thanks for this short one. I also tried and it didn't match AA. Also fails to match Ab. –  SpaceTrucker Apr 24 '13 at 9:04
    
@SpaceTrucker So I didn't really get you question... It answers "what regex can I use to match strings like Aa, Dd or Uu without explicitly specifiying any possible combination". But you need to match AA and Ab too? –  sp00m Apr 24 '13 at 9:06
    
The regex must not match AA. Your answer is correct as far as I have tested. –  SpaceTrucker Apr 24 '13 at 9:09

Evgeniy Dorofeev solution is working (+1), but it can be done simpler, using only a lookahead

(\\p{Lu})(?=\\p{Ll})(?i)\\1

(\\p{Lu}) matches a uppercase character and stores it to \\1

(?=\\p{Ll}) is a positive lookahead assertion ensuring that the next character is a lowercase letter.

(?i) is an inline modifier, enabling case independent matching.

\\1 matches the uppercase letter from the first part (but now case independent because of the modifier in front).

Test it:

String[] TestInput = { "foobar", "Aal", "TTest" };

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(\\p{Lu})(?=\\p{Ll})(?i)\\1");

for (String t : TestInput) {
    Matcher m = p.matcher(t);
    if (m.find()) {
        System.out.println(t + " ==> " + true);
    } else {
        System.out.println(t + " ==> " + false);
    }
}

Output:

foobar ==> false
Aal ==> true
TTest ==> false

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This involves only the first two chars (should be three). Also, it doesn't seem to achieve the requirement even for the first two chars: it should give true for "Ab" and false for "AB", "ab", "aB", and "Aa". But still, +1 from me for good techniques, I think it can be fixed. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '13 at 9:28
    
@stema +1 now I know about \\p{Ll} –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Apr 24 '13 at 11:40

I have a requirement that says a name must not start with 3 identical letters ignoring their case.

You should use the case-insensitive option: (?i)

and the "catch-all" \w e.g.: (?i)(\w)\1{2,}.*

or just [a-z] e.g.: (?i)([a-z])\1{2,}.*

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It might make sense here to use separate checks for the different requirements, especially since requirement lists tend to grow over time.

Your requirements as described are:

A name must not start with 3 identical letters ignoring their case

and

A name starts with an upper case letter followed by lower case letters.

Performing a separate check for each (as described in the other posts) also allows you to give the user proper error messages describing what is actually wrong. And it's certainly more readable.

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