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Yet another reshape problem in data.table

set.seed(1234)
DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))
#    x y  v
# 1: 1 A 12
# 2: 1 B 62
...
#11: 3 A 63
#12: 3 B 49

I would like to do a cumulative sum of x and v by y but the result to be presented as: The number of lines always stays the same, and when y==A the SUM.*.A is incremented, same when y==B. (As usual y could have many factors, 2 in this example)

#     SUM.x.A SUM.x.B  SUM.v.A SUM.v.B
# 1:        1      NA       12      NA
# 2:        1       1       12      62
...
#11:       12       9       318     289
#12:       12      12       318     338

EDIT: Here is my poor solution clearly overly complicated

#first step is to create cumsum columns
colNames <- c("x","v"); newColNames <- paste0("SUM.",colNames)
DT[, newColNames:=lapply(.SD,cumsum) ,by=y, .SDcols=colNames, with=F];
#now we need to reshape each SUM.* to SUM.*.{yvalue}
DT[,N:=.I]; setattr(DT,"sorted","N")

g <- function(DT,SD){
  cols <- c('N',grep('SUM',colnames(SD), value=T));
  Yval <- unique(SD[,y]);
  merge(DT, SD[,cols, with=F], suffixe=c('',paste0('.',Yval)), all.x=T);    
}

DT <- Reduce(f=g,init=DT,x=split(DT,DT$y));

locf = function(x) {
  ind = which(!is.na(x))    
  if(is.na(x[1])) ind = c(1,ind)
  rep(x[ind], times = diff( c(ind, length(x) + 1) )) 
}

newColNames <- grep('SUM',colnames(DT),value=T);
DT <- DT[, (newColNames):=lapply(.SD, locf), .SDcols=newColNames]
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

cumsum0 <- function(x) { x <- cumsum(x); ifelse(x == 0, NA, x) }
DT2 <- DT[, {SUM.<-y; lapply(data.table(model.matrix(~ SUM.:x + SUM.:v + 0)), cumsum0)}]
setnames(DT2, sub("(.):(.)", "\\2.\\1", names(DT2)))

Simplifications:

1) If using 0 in place of NA is ok then it can be simplified by omitting the first line which defines cumsum0 and replacing cumsum0 in the next line with cumsum.

2) The result of the second line has these names:

> names(DT2)
[1] "SUM.A:x" "SUM.B:x" "SUM.A:v" "SUM.B:v"

so if that is sufficient the last line can be dropped since its only purpose is to make the names exactly the same as in the question.

The result (without the simplifications) is:

> DT2
    SUM.x.A SUM.x.B SUM.v.A SUM.v.B
 1:       1      NA      12      NA
 2:       1       1      12      62
 3:       2       1      72      62
 4:       2       2      72     123
 5:       4       2     155     123
 6:       4       4     155     220
 7:       6       4     156     220
 8:       6       6     156     242
 9:       9       6     255     242
10:       9       9     255     289
11:      12       9     318     289
12:      12      12     318     338
share|improve this answer
1  
You could replace SUM. <- y with SUM. <- factor(y) but actually in "R version 3.0.0 (2013-04-03)" I get no warnings. What version are you using? –  G. Grothendieck Apr 24 '13 at 13:28
1  
Note this in the News for 3.0.0 : To support options(stringsAsFactors = FALSE), model.frame(), model.matrix() and replications() now automatically convert character vectors to factors without a warning. –  G. Grothendieck Apr 24 '13 at 13:42
    
I think its pretty specific to this question. There are some reshaping solutions using data.table in SO (maybe posted by you?) but at this point I am not sure that reshaping is the best use of data.table without some further development. –  G. Grothendieck Apr 24 '13 at 14:19
    
@G.Grothendieck I tried to wrap your stuff in a function and use := instead of creating DT2, but then DT do not get updated. It looks like DT is getting modified in lapply(data.table(model.matrix(~ SUM.:x + SUM.:v + 0)), cumsum0) am I correct ? –  statquant Apr 24 '13 at 14:36
    
Try .Internal(inspect(DT)); DT0<-DT; DT2 <- DT[, {SUM.<-y; lapply(data.table(model.matrix(~ SUM.:x + SUM.:v + 0)), cumsum)}]; .Internal(inspect(DT)); identical(DT0,DT); identical(as.data.frame(DT0),as.data.frame(DT)) and I get the same addresses and TRUE for both comparisons so DT does not appear to be modified. –  G. Grothendieck Apr 24 '13 at 14:46

Here's another way:

ys <- unique(DT$y)
sdcols <- c("x", "v")
cols <- paste0("SUM.", sdcols)
DT[, c(cols) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by = y, .SDcols = sdcols]
for( i in seq_along(ys)) {
    cols <- paste0("SUM.", sdcols, ".", ys[i])
    DT[, c("v1", "v2") := list(SUM.x, SUM.v[i]), by = SUM.x]
    DT[, c("v1", "v2") := list(c(rep(NA_integer_, (i-1)), v1)[seq_len(.N)], 
    c(rep(NA_integer_, (i-1)), v2)[seq_len(.N)])]
    setnames(DT, c("v1", "v2"), cols)
}

My version of benchmarking with mnel's (from his post) and this function:

The function from this post:

arun <- function(DT) {

    ys <- unique(DT$y)
    sdcols <- c("x", "v")
    cols <- paste0("SUM.", sdcols)
    DT[, c(cols) := lapply(.SD, cumsum), by = y, .SDcols = sdcols]
    for( i in seq_along(ys)) {
        cols <- paste0("SUM.", sdcols, ".", ys[i])
        DT[, c("v1", "v2") := list(SUM.x, SUM.v[i]), by = SUM.x]
        DT[, c("v1", "v2") := list(c(rep(NA_integer_, (i-1)), v1)[seq_len(.N)], 
        c(rep(NA_integer_, (i-1)), v2)[seq_len(.N)])]
        setnames(DT, c("v1", "v2"), cols)
    }
    DT
}

Function from mnel's post:

mnel <- function(DT) {
    set.seed(1234)
    DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))
    DT[, id := seq_len(nrow(DT))]
    setkey(DT, y)
    uniqY <- unique(DT$y)
    for(jj in uniqY){
      nc <- do.call(paste, c(expand.grid('Sum', c('x','v'),jj), sep ='.'))
      DT[.(jj), (nc) := list(cumsum(x), cumsum(v))]

    }
    setkey(DT, id)
    DT[, 5:8 := lapply(.SD, function(x) { 
      xn <- is.na(x)
      x[xn] <- -Inf
      xx <- cummax(x)
      # deal with leading NA values
        if(xn[1]){
        xn1 <- which(xn)[1]
      xx[seq_len(xn1)] <- NA}   
      xx }), .SDcols = 5:8]
}

Function from statquant:

statquant <- function(DT){
    #first step is to create cumsum columns
    colNames <- c("x","v"); newColNames <- paste0("SUM.",colNames)
    DT[, newColNames:=lapply(.SD,cumsum) ,by=y, .SDcols=colNames, with=F];
    #now we need to reshape each SUM.* to SUM.*.{yvalue}
    DT[,N:=.I]; setattr(DT,"sorted","N")

    g <- function(DT,SD){
      cols <- c('N',grep('SUM',colnames(SD), value=T));
      Yval <- unique(SD[,y]);
      merge(DT, SD[,cols, with=F], suffixe=c('',paste0('.',Yval)), all.x=T);    
    }

    DT <- Reduce(f=g,init=DT,x=split(DT,DT$y));

    locf = function(x) {
      ind = which(!is.na(x))    
      if(is.na(x[1])) ind = c(1,ind)
      rep(x[ind], times = diff( c(ind, length(x) + 1) )) 
    }

    newColNames <- grep('SUM',colnames(DT),value=T);
    DT <- DT[, (newColNames):=lapply(.SD, locf), .SDcols=newColNames]
    DT
}

Function from grothendieck

grothendieck <- function(DT) {
    cumsum0 <- function(x) { x <- cumsum(x); ifelse(x == 0, NA, x) }
    DT2 <- DT[, {SUM.<-y; lapply(data.table(model.matrix(~ SUM.:x + SUM.:v + 0)), cumsum0)}]
    setnames(DT2, sub("(.):(.)", "\\2.\\1", names(DT2)))
    DT2
}

Benchmarking:

library(data.table)
library(zoo)
set.seed(1234)
DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark( s <- statquant(copy(DT)), g <- grothendieck(copy(DT)), 
                m <- mnel(copy(DT)), a <- arun(copy(DT)), times = 1e3)

# Unit: milliseconds
#                         expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#     s <- statquant(copy(DT)) 13.041125 13.674083 14.493870 17.273151 144.74186  1000
#  g <- grothendieck(copy(DT))  3.634120  3.859143  4.006085  4.443388  80.01984  1000
#          m <- mnel(copy(DT))  7.819286  8.234178  8.596090 10.423668  87.07668  1000
#          a <- arun(copy(DT))  6.925419  7.369286  7.703003  9.262719  53.39823  1000

resulting data.table "a" (arun's)

#     x y  v SUM.x SUM.v SUM.x.A SUM.v.A SUM.x.B SUM.v.B
#  1: 1 A 12     1    12       1      12      NA      NA
#  2: 1 B 62     1    62       1      12       1      62
#  3: 1 A 60     2    72       2      72       1      62
#  4: 1 B 61     2   123       2      72       2     123
#  5: 2 A 83     4   155       4     155       2     123
#  6: 2 B 97     4   220       4     155       4     220
#  7: 2 A  1     6   156       6     156       4     220
#  8: 2 B 22     6   242       6     156       6     242
#  9: 3 A 99     9   255       9     255       6     242
# 10: 3 B 47     9   289       9     255       9     289
# 11: 3 A 63    12   318      12     318       9     289
# 12: 3 B 49    12   338      12     318      12     338

Resulting data.table "m" (mnel's)

#    x y  v id Sum.x.A Sum.v.A Sum.x.B Sum.v.B
#  1: 1 A 12  1       1      12      NA      NA
#  2: 1 B 62  2       1      12       1      62
#  3: 1 A 60  3       2      72       1      62
#  4: 1 B 61  4       2      72       2     123
#  5: 2 A 83  5       4     155       2     123
#  6: 2 B 97  6       4     155       4     220
#  7: 2 A  1  7       6     156       4     220
#  8: 2 B 22  8       6     156       6     242
#  9: 3 A 99  9       9     255       6     242
# 10: 3 B 47 10       9     255       9     289
# 11: 3 A 63 11      12     318       9     289
# 12: 3 B 49 12      12     318      12     338

Resulting data.table "s" (statquant's)

#      N x y  v SUM.x SUM.v SUM.x.A SUM.v.A SUM.x.B SUM.v.B
#  1:  1 1 A 12     1    12       1      12      NA      NA
#  2:  2 1 B 62     1    62       1      12       1      62
#  3:  3 1 A 60     2    72       2      72       1      62
#  4:  4 1 B 61     2   123       2      72       2     123
#  5:  5 2 A 83     4   155       4     155       2     123
#  6:  6 2 B 97     4   220       4     155       4     220
#  7:  7 2 A  1     6   156       6     156       4     220
#  8:  8 2 B 22     6   242       6     156       6     242
#  9:  9 3 A 99     9   255       9     255       6     242
# 10: 10 3 B 47     9   289       9     255       9     289
# 11: 11 3 A 63    12   318      12     318       9     289
# 12: 12 3 B 49    12   338      12     318      12     338

Resulting data.table "g" (grothendieck's)

#    SUM.x.A SUM.x.B SUM.v.A SUM.v.B
#  1:       1      NA      12      NA
#  2:       1       1      12      62
#  3:       2       1      72      62
#  4:       2       2      72     123
#  5:       4       2     155     123
#  6:       4       4     155     220
#  7:       6       4     156     220
#  8:       6       6     156     242
#  9:       9       6     255     242
# 10:       9       9     255     289
# 11:      12       9     318     289
# 12:      12      12     318     338
share|improve this answer
    
cumsum(.SD) is nifty syntax but creates at least three copies of the .SD object. –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 11:28
    
@mnel and Arun, I answered with a benchmark removing the NA-job and updating with mnel suggestion... –  statquant Apr 24 '13 at 11:50

Not sure this is the best solution, but you could do something like the following.

set.seed(1234)
DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))
DT[, id := seq_len(nrow(DT))]

setkey(DT, y)

uniqY <- unique(DT$y)

for(jj in uniqY){
  nc <- do.call(paste, c(expand.grid('Sum', c('x','v'),jj), sep ='.'))
  DT[.(jj), (nc) := list(cumsum(x), cumsum(v))]

}

setkey(DT, id)

DT[, 5:8 := lapply(.SD, function(x) { 
  xn <- is.na(x)
  x[xn] <- -Inf
  xx <- cummax(x)
  # deal with leading NA values
    if(xn[1]){
    xn1 <- which(xn)[1]
  xx[seq_len(xn1)] <- NA}   

  xx }), .SDcols = 5:8]
share|improve this answer
    
@statquant see my edit. Should be a bit more robust –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 10:49
    
yes It is much better than mine, I always forget about for loops for that king of job, the 5:8 at the end is easily replacable. Also why do you not use na.locf ? –  statquant Apr 24 '13 at 11:15
    
looking at the source code for na.locf it looks like it does a lot more work than you require ( not speed checked though), also not using means not having to load zoo –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 11:26
    
The for loop will not be required if FR 2619 is implemented. –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 11:31

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