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I'm trying to model document a hierarchy in CouchDB to use in my system, which is conceptually similar to a blog. Each blog post belongs to at least one category and each category can have many posts. Categories are hierarchical, meaning that if a post belongs to CatB in the hierarchy "CatA->CatB" ("CatB is in CatA)", it belongs also to CatA.

Users must be able to quickly find all post in a category (and all its children).

Solution 1 Each document of the post type contains a "category" array representing its position in the hierarchy (see 2).

{
   "_id": "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83",
   "type": "post",
   "author": "dexter",
   "title": "Hello",
   "category":["OO","Programming","C++"]
}

Solution 2 Each document of the post type contains the "category" string representing its path in the hierarchy (see 4).

{
   "_id": "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83",
   "type": "post",
   "author": "dexter",
   "title": "Hello",
   "category": "OO/Programming/C++"
}

Solution 3 Each document of the post type contains its parent "category" id representing its path in the hierarchy (see 3). A hierarchical category structure is built through linked "category" document types.

{
   "_id": "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83",
   "type": "post",
   "author": "dexter",
   "title": "Hello",
   "category_id": "3"
}

{
   "_id": "1",
   "type": "category",
   "name": "OO"
}


{
   "_id": "2",
   "type": "category",
   "name": "Programming",
   "parent": "1"
}


{
   "_id": "3",
   "type": "category",
   "name": "C++",
   "parent": "2"
}

Question

What's the best way to store this kind of relationship in CouchDB? What's the most efficient solution in terms of disk space, scalability and retrieval speed?

Can such a relation be modelled to take into account localised category names?

Disclaimer

I know this question has been asked a few times already here on SO, but it seems there's no definitive answer to it nor an answer which deals with the pros and cons of each solution. Sorry for the length of the question :)

Read so far

CouchDB - The Definitive Guide

Storing Hierarchical Data in CouchDB

Retrieving Hierarchical/Nested Data From CouchDB

Using CouchDB group_level for hierarchical data

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There's no right answer to this question, hence the lack of a definitive answer. It mostly depends on what kind of usage you want to optimize for.

You state that retrieval speed of documents that belong to a certain category (and their children) is most important. The first two solutions allow you to create a view that emits a blog post multiple times, once for each category in the chain from the leaf to the root. Thus selecting all documents can be done using a single (and thus fast) query. The only difference of second solution to first solution is that you move the parsing of the category "path" into components from the code that inserts the document to the map function of the view. I would prefer the first solution as it's simpler to implement the map function and a bit more flexible (e.g. it allows a category's name to contain a slash character).

In your scenario you probably also want to create a reduced view which counts the number of blog posts for each category. This is very simple with either of these solutions. With a fitting reduction function, the number of post in every category can be retrieved using a single request.

A downside of the first two solutions is that renaming or moving a category from one parent to another requires every document to be updated. The third solution allows that without touching the documents. But from the description of your scenario I assume that retrieval by category is very frequent and category renaming/moving is very rare.

Solution 4 I propose a fourth solution where blog post documents hold references to category documents but still reference all the ancestors of the post's category. This allows categories to be renamed without touching the blog posts and allows you to store additional metadata with a category (e.g. translations of the category name or a description):

{
    "_id": "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83",
    "type": "post",
    "author": "dexter",
    "title": "Hello",
    "category_ids": [3, 2, 1]
}

{
    "_id": "1",
    "type": "category",
    "name": "OO"
}

{
    "_id": "2",
    "type": "category",
    "name": "Programming",
    "parent": "1"
}


{
    "_id": "3",
    "type": "category",
    "name": "C++",
    "parent": "2"
}

You will still have to store the parents of categories with the categories, which is duplicating data in the posts, to allow categories to be traversed (e.g. for displaying a tree of categories for navigation).

You can extend this solution or any of your solutions to allow a post to be categorized under multiple categories, or a category to have multiple parents. When a post is categorized in multiple categories, you will need to store the union of the ancestors of each category in the post's document while preserving the categories selected by the author to allow them to be displayed with the post or edited later.

Lets assume that there is an additional category named "Ajax" with anchestors "JavaScript", "Programming" and "OO". To simplify the following example, I've chosen the document IDs of the categories to equal the category's name.

{
    "_id": "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83",
    "type": "post",
    "author": "dexter",
    "title": "Hello",
    "category_ids": ["C++", "Ajax"],
    "category_anchestor_ids": ["C++", "Programming", "OO", "Ajax", "JavaScript"]
}

To allow a category to have multiple parents, just store multiple parent IDs with a category. You will need to eliminate duplicates while finding all the ancestors of a category.

View for Solution 4 Suppose you want to get all the blog posts for a specific category. We will use a database with the following sample data:

{ "_id": "100", "type": "category", "name": "OO"                              }
{ "_id": "101", "type": "category", "name": "Programming", "parent_id": "100" }
{ "_id": "102", "type": "category", "name": "C++",         "parent_id": "101" }
{ "_id": "103", "type": "category", "name": "JavaScript",  "parent_id": "101" }
{ "_id": "104", "type": "category", "name": "AJAX",        "parent_id": "103" }

{ "_id": "200", "type": "post", "title": "OO Post",          "category_id": "104", "category_anchestor_ids": ["100"]                      }
{ "_id": "201", "type": "post", "title": "Programming Post", "category_id": "101", "category_anchestor_ids": ["101", "100"]               }
{ "_id": "202", "type": "post", "title": "C++ Post",         "category_id": "102", "category_anchestor_ids": ["102", "101", "100"]        }
{ "_id": "203", "type": "post", "title": "AJAX Post",        "category_id": "104", "category_anchestor_ids": ["104", "103", "101", "100"] }

In addition to that, we use a view called posts_by_category in a design document called _design/blog with the the following map function:

function (doc) {
    if (doc.type == 'post') {
        for (i in doc.category_anchestor_ids) {
            emit([doc.category_anchestor_ids[i]], doc)
        }
    }
}

Then we can get all the posts in the Programming category (which has ID "101") or one of it's subcategories using a GET requests to the following URL.

http://localhost:5984/so/_design/blog/_view/posts_by_category?reduce=false&key=["101"]

This will return a view result with the keys set to the category ID and the values set to the post documents. The same view can also be used to get a summary list of all categories and the number of post in that category and it's children. We add the following reduce function to the view:

function (keys, values, rereduce) {
    if (rereduce) {
        return sum(values)
    } else {
        return values.length
    }
}

And then we use the following URL:

http://localhost:5984/so/_design/blog/_view/posts_by_category?group_level=1

This will return a reduced view result with the keys again set to the category ID and the values set to the number of posts in each category. In this example, the categories name's would have to be fetched separately but it is possible to create view where each row in the reduced view result already contains the category name.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! –  Dexter Apr 24 '13 at 15:48
    
Is there any reason why "8e7a440862347a22f4a1b2ca7f000e83" is a better choice for a category _id rather than the category name itself? –  Dexter Apr 30 '13 at 6:40
2  
8e7a4408… is actually the ID of the blog post. Still, there are many reasons not to use the category's name as the ID: Allow for reserved characters in category names, rename a category without touching the blog post documents, allow multiple categories with the same name (e.g. each a subcategory for a different topic or because different users are using the same system, each creating their own category hierarchy). There also may not be a canonical name for a category, e.g. when there are multiple translations. –  Feuermurmel Apr 30 '13 at 9:53
    
Would you kindly provide a view example for your proposed solution which returns all the the documents contained in the "Programming" category (and also the documents contained in all its children!)? –  Dexter Apr 30 '13 at 11:23
1  
@Dexter There you go. Now you have to upvote this answer really hard ;). –  Feuermurmel May 2 '13 at 8:34

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