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Is there any way to get n number of 1s using only these binary operations ( !, ~, &, ^, |, +, <<, >> ) where n is an input?

Example,

n ---> output
0 ---> 0000
1 ---> 0001
2 ---> 0011
3 ---> 0111
4 ---> 1111
...
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Yes, it is possible. What have you tried? (It can be done with two operations). –  Mats Petersson Apr 24 '13 at 10:38
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If you allow ~ and + you might as well allow - (because x - y == ~(~x + y)) –  harold Apr 24 '13 at 10:41
    
Starting from a=0; a=a+a+1; (There's no need to have an explicit formula, as one can do it iteratively. a+a can be done with a shift << and + can be replaced with | or ^. ) –  Aki Suihkonen Apr 24 '13 at 10:43
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do it like this:

// Since "-" is not on your list while "+" is, I'll add negative 1
// using `~0`; this assumes that your computer uses 2's complement
// representation of negative numbers.
(1 << n) + ~0;

The idea is that 1 << n produces a power of two: 1, 10, 100, 1000, and so on. Adding a negative one produces 2^n-1, which is what your pattern represents.

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What is the format specifier to use for the printf() to print this?I used %d and it's simply printing the value in the decimal system.If I use n=3, then it prints 7, but I want it as 111.How to do it? –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 24 '13 at 10:47
    
Please tell me how to do that, ie to display 7 as 111.It's embarrassing to ask something that simple, but it's worse never to learn –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 24 '13 at 10:56
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@SheerFish: AFAIK there's no standard printf specifier to print in binary, but writing a decimal to binary converter is quite straightforward. –  Matteo Italia Apr 24 '13 at 10:58
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Yes. You can do

~(~(1<<n) + 1)

Example:

Say n is 2.

  1. ~(~(1<<2) + 1)
  2. ~(~(100) + 1)
  3. ~(111..1011 + 1)
  4. ~(111..1100 )

    = 11

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