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Is it possible to add a WHERE statement to an AS? When i run sql like this is always fails. I just need some kind of example, and I couldn't find anything at stack from my searching.

SELECT *, 
COUNT(my_other_table.id) as 'c_others' WHERE my_other_table.active = 1
LEFT JOIN my_other_table on my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
FROM my_accounts
ORDER BY my_accounts.name

Note how I added WHERE my_other_table.active = 1, that's where i'm breaking everything

I'm not 100% sure how AS statements work, usually I don't do anything complex with them. But now that I need to, i can't figure it out

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There is a set structure for sql and must be adhered to or the system doesn't know what your doing @Till answer is the best, see the syntax and particular structure ;) –  glh Apr 24 '13 at 10:59
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A WHERE clause has to be at the end of the table list, before the optional ORDER BY. Look at this definition of the structure a SELECT statement has to adhere to:

SELECT 
[ DISTINCT | ALL ] 
  <select list>
  FROM <table reference list>
[ <where clause> ]             <-- THIS IS THE INTERESTING PART
[ <group by clause> ]
[ <having clause> ]
[ UNION [ALL] <query specification> ]
[ <order by clause> ]

So your query should look like this:

SELECT *, COUNT(my_other_table.id) AS c_others
FROM my_accounts
LEFT JOIN my_other_table ON my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
WHERE my_other_table.active = 1
ORDER BY my_accounts.name

You also could add the condition to your ON clause:

SELECT *, COUNT(my_other_table.id) AS c_others
FROM my_accounts
JOIN my_other_table ON 
   my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
   AND my_other_table.active = 1
ORDER BY my_accounts.name

The AS statement does nothing else than specify an alias name for a selected field. This can be useful when a fieldname is too long, you want to define a name for a function call (e.g. COUNT(column) AS counter, just as you used it) or to avoid name clashes when you join tables with similar column names. You can also use AS to specify an alias for a table name to avoid having to type it more than once.

Edit:

As noted in the comments by HamletHakobyan: COUNT is an aggregation function that might require you to use a GROUP BY clause on the other fields selected in your statement. So you need to expand the * into the actual fieldnames and do it like this:

SELECT
   my_accounts.name, 
   my_accounts.firstname, 
   COUNT(my_other_table.id) AS c_others
FROM my_accounts
JOIN my_other_table ON 
   my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
   AND my_other_table.active = 1
GROUP BY my_accounts.name, my_accounts.firstname
ORDER BY my_accounts.name
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1  
If you in SQL Server you can't do this without grouping. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Apr 24 '13 at 10:57
    
+1 for this is the interesting part ;) –  glh Apr 24 '13 at 11:00
    
@HamletHakobyan True. I'll add that. :) –  Till Helge Apr 24 '13 at 11:03
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You can just add the WHERE clause as:

SELECT *, 
    COUNT(my_other_table.id) as 'c_others'
FROM my_accounts
    LEFT JOIN my_other_table
        ON my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
WHERE my_other_table.active = 1
GROUP BY <list all necessary fields>
ORDER BY my_accounts.name

or,if you want to get selective count of elements use this

SELECT <list all necessary fields>, 
    COUNT(CASE WHEN my_other_table.active = 1 THEN my_other_table.id END) as 'c_others'
FROM my_accounts
    LEFT JOIN my_other_table
        ON my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
GROUP BY <list all necessary fields>
ORDER BY my_accounts.name
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AS merely introduces a new name for an object (column, table, etc). As such, applying a WHERE to it doesn't make sense (since the name of the, in this instance, column) is fixed for the entire result set.

At a guess, you actually want to modify the COUNT, so that you're only counting those rows where active is 1:

SELECT *, 
SUM(CASE WHEN my_other_table.active = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) as 'c_others'
LEFT JOIN my_other_table on my_accounts.id = my_other_table.account_connection
FROM my_accounts
ORDER BY my_accounts.name
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AS is just a keyword to give a name to column. Which is handy in complex column definitions. The name will work only in query result, but not within query - you cannot reference it back in the same query. You'll have to use sub-query then.

WHERE (as well as other keywords) have their place in Query as Till Helge have had written.

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