Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've run into some jQuery that has:

  .on('mousedown.minicolors', '.minicolors-swatch', function  (event) {

       --  some code  --
   }) 

Control came here directly from jQuery.min.js in response to the mousedown.

The first question is, what is the wrapped set that the on() method is working on? Second, the .minicolors after mousedown seems to be a "namespace," from reading the documentation. "mousedown" is indeed the name of a plugin that has been created here. But what, exactly, does that namespace do for us in mousedown.minicolors?

Thanks for adding any clarity here?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
"mousedown" is indeed the name of a plugin(...) did you mean "minicolors" is indeed the name of a plugin(...) ? –  MythThrazz Apr 24 '13 at 11:16
    
Yes. Sorry. 4AM posts are always risky. –  Steve Apr 24 '13 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first question is, what is the wrapped set that the on() method is working on?

Whatever is before the dot -- your code snippet starts just after that, so we don't know.

This is the delegated version of .on which sets up one event handler on each element in the wrapped set for .on (in the delegated version, this is typically just one element since if there were more you could substitute both with any of their common ancestors up to and including document).

This event handler responds to any event triggered on a descendant that matches the selector provided. For example, $(document).on("click", "div.foo", ...) installs an event handler on document that responds to a click on any div having the class foo.

Second, the .minicolors after mousedown seems to be a "namespace," from reading the documentation. "mousedown" is indeed the name of a plugin that has been created here. But what, exactly, does that namespace do for us in mousedown.minicolors?

The actual plugin name is minicolors; mousedown is the (namespaced) event name. What the namespace does is:

  1. It allows you to differentiate between events with the same common names as defined by different plugins. Of course you could do that also without the namespace abstraction, e.g. with events named plugin1mousedown and plugin2mousedown, but those would be two different events. Namespacing allows you to "tag" an event handler while still referring to the same event that a non-namespaced handler refers to.
  2. It allows you to unbind all event handlers for events in the same namespace at once: $whatever.off(".minicolors"). This is very useful whenever a plugin instance is "destroyed".
share|improve this answer

The namespace allows you to easily remove the event handler like this:

.off('mousedown.minicolors');

Otherwise you'd have to remove the eventhandler by also passing the original eventhandler itself:

var originalEventHandler = function() { ... };
el.on('mousedown', originalEventHandler)
el.off('mousedown', originalEventHandler)
share|improve this answer
    
I never knew about that! That's neat. –  Colin DeClue Apr 24 '13 at 14:46

Regarding the wrapped set that the .on is being applied to, I can see now that it's $(document). The code is:

//Handle Events
$(document)

.on('mousedown.minicolors', '.minicolors-grid', function (event) {
              })
.on('mousedown.minicolors', '.minicolors-space', function (event) {
              })
.on('mouseover.minicolors', '.minicolors-grid', function (event) {
              })
.on('mouseover.minicolors', '.minicolors-space', function (event) {
              }); 

which is actually

//Handle Events
$(document).on(...).on(...).on(....).on(...);

The punctuation was throwing me, and it still seems like a strange way to define all your event handlers, but I guess it works.

Thanks for the explanation on the namespace.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.