Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I do this in JPA??

DataBase:

School
------
id int PK
name varchar
state int FK (State(id))

State
-----
id int PK
desc varchar

Java:

SchoolShow
----------
int id;
String name;
int iState;
String sState;

Code:

select sc.name, st.desc from school sc, state st where st.id=sc.state and sc.id=?

while(rs.hasNext()){
    SchoolShow ss=new SchoolShow();
    ss.setName(rs.getString("name"));
    ss.setSState(rs.getString("desc"));
}

¿could I have an @Entity with properties from different tables?

thanks in advance!!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should create entities for the School and State tables and use a @ManyToOne relation on the state attribute of the School entity to reference the state.

Then you can query like this, navigating over the relation from school to the state:

List result = em.createQuery("SELECT sc.name, sc.state.desc FROM School sc").getResultList(); 

Note that each element of the list is an Object[]. You will need to iterate over them and assign the values to your DTO.

You can also use JPA constructor expressions for typesafety and less clutter:

List<DTO> dtos = em.createQuery("SELECT NEW com.example.DTO( sc.name, sc.state.desc) FROM School sc").getResultList();

The DTO type must have a constructor with all the relevant attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks kostja! this was what i was thinking, but i wanted to assure i need an object attribute in school -> state, instead of a primitive. So JPA will be so much slower than JDBC...why people use it??? –  leccionesonline Apr 24 '13 at 12:11
    
@leccionesonline - you're welcome :) JPA, as a JDBC abstraction, will indeed be slower than JDBC in most cases, but not all - JPA provides proper caching while JDBC does not. I have yet to see a real JPA-JDBC benchmark though, so I cant say how much slower. The reason I'm using JPA is that JDBC requires much more boilerplate code, which is a drain on dev time both while writing and reading. –  kostja Apr 24 '13 at 12:21
    
the reason I'm moving to JPA is I've heard JDBC is not supported by Spring anymore, JPA has become reference implementation –  leccionesonline Apr 24 '13 at 14:39
    
@leccionesonline I think they are still retaining the JDBC functionality (springsource.org/spring-data/jdbc-extensions), but Spring Data is definitely moving towards JPA, so your investment is not for naught :) –  kostja Apr 24 '13 at 15:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.