Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data.table with a logical column. Why the name of the logical column can not be used directly for the i argument? See the example.

dt <- data.table(x = c(T, T, F, T), y = 1:4)

# Works
dt[dt$x]
dt[!dt$x]

# Works
dt[x == T]
dt[x == F]

# Does not work
dt[x]
dt[!x]
share|improve this question
    
just edited my answer –  Michele Apr 24 '13 at 12:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

From ?data.table

Advanced: When i is a single variable name, it is not considered an expression of column names and is instead evaluated in calling scope.

So dt[x] will try to evaluate x in the calling scope (in this case the global environment)

You can get around this by using ( or { or force

dt[(x)]
dt[{x}]
dt[force(x)]
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) interesting use of force function. How does force work in this case? How does it alter environment/scope? –  Nishanth Apr 24 '13 at 12:21
    
A bit more info on why here. –  Matt Dowle Apr 24 '13 at 12:26
    
force basically stops it being intepreted as a single variable (this is done with some computing on the call within [.data.table) force then forces the evaluation of x, which will return x within the data.table scope. –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 12:28
    
@e4e5f5 force works just because it makes i not a single name anymore. dt[identity(x)] would work for the same reason, or just dt[(x)] is easiest. I'm kinda liking (x) on the LHS of := too, instead of with=FALSE, so (x) is starting to become idiomatic data.table (although it's more by happy accident than by design). –  Matt Dowle Apr 24 '13 at 12:31

This should also work and is arguably more natural:

setkey(dt, x)
dt[J(TRUE)]
dt[J(FALSE)]
share|improve this answer

x is not defined in the global environment. If you try this,

> with(dt, dt[x])
      x y
1: TRUE 1
2: TRUE 2
3: TRUE 4

It would work. Or this:

> attach(dt)
> dt[!x]
       x y
1: FALSE 3

EDIT:

according to the documentation the j parameter takes column name, in fact:

> dt[x]
Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) : object 'x' not found
> dt[j = x]
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE

then, the i parameter takes either numerical or logical expression (like x itself should be), however it seems it (data.table) can't see x as logical without this:

> dt[i = x]
Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) : object 'x' not found
> dt[i = as.logical(x)]
      x y
1: TRUE 1
2: TRUE 2
3: TRUE 4
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure this is a problem, x is not defined in the global environment but dt[x == T] works. –  djhurio Apr 24 '13 at 11:56
    
You're right, however this error Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) : object 'x' not found indicates that. So, you probably highlighted a possible bug –  Michele Apr 24 '13 at 11:58
    
@djhurio In both i and j part of the documentation of [.data.table it's said the expression is evaluated within the frame of the data.table (i.e. it sees column names as if they are variables). However, in the i parameter it seems that an explicit expression like == or as.logical is needed. –  Michele Apr 24 '13 at 12:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.