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I have a problem

My application on close has to logout from web application. It's take some time. I want to inform user about it with " logging out" information

class Belt(gtk.Window):

def __init__(self):
    super(Belt, self).__init__()
    self.connect("destroy", self.destroy)

def destroy(self, widget, data=None):
    if self.isLogged:
        md = gtk.MessageDialog(None, gtk.DIALOG_MODAL | gtk.DIALOG_DESTROY_WITH_PARENT, ico, gtk.BUTTONS_NONE, txt)
        md.showall()
        self.send('users/logout.json', {}, False, False)
    gtk.main_quit()

def main(self):
    if self.iniError is False:
        gtk.gdk.threads_init()
        gtk.gdk.threads_enter()
        gtk.main()
        gtk.gdk.threads_leave()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = Belt()
    app.main()

When I try to show dialog in destroy method only window does appear, without icon and text. I want to, that this dialog have no confirm button, just the information, and dialog have to be destroy with all app.

Any ideas?

Sorry for my poor English

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically, GTK has to have the chance to work through the event queue all the time. If some other processing takes a long time and the event queue is not processed in the meantime, your application will become unresponsive. This is usually not what you want, because it may result in your windows not being updated, remaining grey, having strange artefacts, or other kinds of visible glitches. It may even cause your window system to grey the window out and offer to kill the presumably frozen application.

The solutution is to make sure the event queue is being processed. There are two primary ways to do this. If the part that takes long consists of many incremental steps, you can periodically process the queue yourself:

def this_takes_really_long():
    for _ in range(10000):
        do_some_more_work()
        while gtk.events_pending():
            gtk.main_iteration()

In the general case, you'll have to resort to some kind of asynchronous processing. The typical way is to put the blocking part into its own thread, and then signal back to the main thread (which sits in the main loop) via idle callbacks. In your code, it might look something like this:

from threading import Thread

import gtk, gobject

class Belt(gtk.Window):

    def __init__(self):
        super(Belt, self).__init__()
        self.connect("destroy", self.destroy)

        self.show_all()

        self.isLogged = True
        self.iniError = False


    def destroy(self, widget, data=None):
        if self.isLogged:
            md = gtk.MessageDialog(None, gtk.DIALOG_MODAL | gtk.DIALOG_DESTROY_WITH_PARENT, 0, gtk.BUTTONS_NONE, "Text")
            md.show_all()
            Thread(target=self._this_takes_very_long).start()


    def main(self):
        if self.iniError is False:
            gtk.gdk.threads_init()
            gtk.gdk.threads_enter()
            gtk.main()
            gtk.gdk.threads_leave()


    def _this_takes_very_long(self):
        self.send('users/logout.json', {}, False, False)
        gobject.idle_add(gtk.main_quit)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = Belt()
    app.main()
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