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I'm trying to make a text block over an image, and in the 1st image it works fine, but if I add another div with the same code, the text block of the 2nd image is positioned in the the 1st image.

There is my example:

  <section>
        <div>
            <img src="">
            <p><span>Text Example 1</span><p>
        </div>
        <div>
            <img src="">
            <p><span>Text Example 2</span><p>   
        </div>

And now the CSS:

img {
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
}

p {

    position: absolute;
    top: 10%; 

width: 100%;

 }

 p span {

    color: white; 
    font: 1.75em Helvetica, Sans-Serif;   
    background: rgb(0, 0, 0); /* fallback color */
    background: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    padding: 0.625em; 
 }

I think the problem is related with the absolute position, but I don't have sure.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
are you using id or class to predefined particular p or span –  The Mechanic Apr 24 '13 at 12:40
1  
show a fiddle for how you doing –  The Mechanic Apr 24 '13 at 12:40
    
I'm using the same class, and it's necessary to use always the same class, because this isn't for a static website. Is for a backbone web app, where a user can add 1 image + 1 text block or 100 images + 100 text blocks. So each one of this sections needs to be independent. –  swayziak Apr 24 '13 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7zCrQ/

Firstly, keep an eye out on your closing tags, you're missing forward slashes.

div {
   position:relative;
}
p {
    color:white;
    position:absolute;
    top:10%;
    left:10px;
}

The containing element -- in this case the <div> -- should have a class of relative. The text you want to appear -- in my example <p> -- should have a position of absolute. Absolutely positioned elements are positioned in relation to the first ancestor that has positioning. This means that the <p> will be 10% from the top of the first ancestor that has relative positioning, in this case the <div>. If you don't give an ancestor positioning, it will be 10% from the top of the <body>.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry but I committed an error in the example that I gave it's a p instead of a div. I think the error may be related with the p Position. –  swayziak Apr 24 '13 at 13:03
    
The element used isn't especially important; the main point is that the parent element (the element that wraps both the image and the caption) should have relative positioning, and the child element (whether it's a <p> or <div>) should have absolute positioning. –  Dre Apr 24 '13 at 13:27
    
Now it works perfectly. Thanks –  swayziak Apr 24 '13 at 17:25

Just use id attribute for each div and give defferent position

div#someid{
  position:absolute;
  top: ...;
}

if you want it absolute positioned;

by using position:absolute the element is positioned relative to its first positioned.

share|improve this answer

You have your positioning mixed up. You want the div to be relatively positioned and the paragraph to be absolutely positioned.

http://tinker.io/701a5

img {
    width: 100%;
}

div {
    position: relative;
}

div p {
    top: 10%; 
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
 }

 div span {

    color: white; 
    font: 1.75em Helvetica, Sans-Serif;   
    background: rgb(0, 0, 0); /* fallback color */
    background: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    padding: 0.625em; 
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry but I committed an error in the example that I gave it's a p instead of a div. I think the error may be related with the p Position. –  swayziak Apr 24 '13 at 13:02
    
The type of element doesn't really matter, it just matters which one has the positioning. Realistically, you probably shouldn't be using divs at all. Depending on your content, figure+figcaption or possibly article+h1 would be more appropriate. –  cimmanon Apr 24 '13 at 13:56

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