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First the mapping,

<set name="Comments" table="cm_events_venue_comment" inverse="true"
        lazy="true" generic="true" cascade="all-delete-orphan"
        batch-size="10" order-by="dateCreated ASC">
    <cache usage="read-write" />
    <key column="venueId" />
    <one-to-many class="VenueComment" />
</set>

A passing test,

[Test]
public void CanSaveAndDeleteComments()
{
    User u = TestDataHelper.CreateUser("Sir", "Talkalot");
    VenueComment comment;
    Venue v = GetVenueById();

    PerformInTransaction(() =>
    {
        userRepository.SaveOrUpdate(u);
        comment = new VenueComment()
        {
            Commenter = u,
            Text = "I like ifs and buts and i cannot lie..",
            DateCreated = DateTime.Now
        };
        v.AddComment(comment);
        comment = new VenueComment()
        {
            Commenter = u,
            Text = "And words ending in 'ly'",
            DateCreated = DateTime.Now
        };
        v.AddComment(comment);
        Assert.DoesNotThrow(()=>venueRepository.SaveOrUpdate(v));
    });

    // Test retrieval 
    Session.Evict(v);

    v = GetVenueById();
    v.Comments.Count.ShouldEqual(2);
    var c = v.Comments.FirstOrDefault<VenueComment>();
    c.Commenter.Id.ShouldEqual(u.Id);

    // and deletion
    PerformInTransaction(() =>
    {
        v.RemoveComment(c);
    });

    Session.Evict(v);
    v = GetVenueById();
    v.Comments.Count.ShouldEqual(1);

}

My problems comes in the controller of my app,

[Authenticate, AcceptAjax]
public ActionResult DeleteComment(int id)
{
    return PerformInTransaction<ActionResult>(() =>
        {
            var comment = commonDao.GetObjectById<VenueComment>(id);
            if (comment == null)
                return JsonFailure("Comment not found");

            if (comment.Commenter.Id == CurrentUser.Id ||
                AuthUtil.IsAdministrator()) //
            {

               var venue = comment.Venue;
               venue.RemoveComment(comment);

                return JsonSuccess(id);
            }
            return JsonFailure("You can only delete comments you created.");
        });
}

According to Log4Net, no deletes were issued. As I said, the above test passes, so the mapping should be correct.

Any clues?

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3 Answers 3

If you take a look at the documentation for the inverse attribute on collection-type property mappings, you will find that setting inverse="false" instructs NHibernate to watch the parent object (the object containing the collection) for changes to the collection, and to insert/delete child objects based on adds/removes on the parent's children-collection.

But, when you set inverse="true", you are instructing NHibernate to watch the child object for changes to the reference property back to the parent object. So when you set the child's parent-reference property, NHibernate will then go and modify the association.

It looks like you do not want to set inverse="true" on the parent's children-collection.

Addendum:

RemoveComment may disassociate the parent from the child (as in, set child.Parent = null). But if it doesn't also disassociate the child from the Session, and if the collection is marked inverse="true" indicating that the child owns the association rather than the collection owning the association, then NHibernate will not send down a delete. NHibernate will only send down a delete if the object is supposed to be deleted - a) if a collection owns the association (inverse="false") and the collection's cascading is set to include deletions and the object is removed from the collection, or b) if the object is deleted from the Session.

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The strange thing is that the test passes fine with the mapping as is. –  JBland Oct 26 '09 at 4:07
    
RemoveComment may disassociate the parent from the child (as in, set child.Parent = null). But if it doesn't also disassociate the child from the Session, and if the collection is marked inverse="true" indicating that the child owns the association rather than the collection owning the association, then NHibernate will not send down a delete. NHibernate will only send down a delete if the object is supposed to be deleted - if a collection owns the object (inverse="false") and the object is removed from the collection, or if the object is deleted from the Session. –  yfeldblum Oct 26 '09 at 4:44

In my experience, this happens when I forget to either commit the transaction or properly close down & flush the session. Session & transaction management is also a notable difference between your test and your presenter.

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Thanks, that gives me an idea of what to check. Will report back in a few... –  JBland Oct 26 '09 at 4:56
    
Your comment lead me to some screwy session handling code, so thanks. See my answer... –  JBland Oct 26 '09 at 6:18

Mystery Solved.... It was a case of the merging of two code bases..

One older dao (commonDao) had a bug where the internal Session property was creating a new session from the session factory per property access, so there was a different session between the object load and flush().

The newer code uses repositories based on S#arp Architecture, which has automatic session management, so the problem did not appear in the unit tests.

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