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I'm reading about perfect forwarding, and this is something I've learnt that has confused me:
When you're trying to achieve perfect forwarding, you'll do something like this:

template<class T> // If I were to call foo with an l-value int, foo would look
void foo(T &&x);  // like this: void foo(int& &&x)

So then I thought, wait, does that mean that if I did this:

template<class T> // If I were to call foo with an l-value int, foo would look
void foo(T x);    // like this: void foo(int& x);

But that's not what happens. foo instead looks like this: void foo(int x);

My question: How come in the perfect forwarding function, T turns into a T& or T&&, but in the other one, T isn't a reference? Can somebody tell me the exact rules for this? I need some clarification!

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When T&& can be become an l-value or r-value reference is what Scott Meyers refers to as "Universal Reference". (I feel that this terminology is getting more adoption among the experts.) I suggest you to take a look at this presentaion and read his article in Overload 111. –  Cassio Neri Apr 25 '13 at 9:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A template parameter T can be deduced as a reference type only if it appears in a function parameter of the form T&&

A function template of the form:

  • template<class T> void f(T x)
    will deduce T as an object type (and x is an object type so is passed by value)

  • template<class T> void f(T& x)
    will deduce T as an object type (and then x has lvalue reference type)

  • template<class T> void f(T&& x)
    will deduce T as

    • either an lvalue reference (so x has lvalue reference type due to reference collapsing rules)
    • or as an object type (so x has rvalue reference type)

How come in the perfect forwarding function, T turns into a T& or T&&, [...]

This is wrong. T becomes a reference type L& or an object type R, not a reference R&&.
The function parameter of the form T&& thus becomes

  • either L& (because adding an rvalue reference to an lvalue reference is still an lvalue reference, just like add_rvalue_reference<L&>::type is still L&)
  • or it becomes R&& (because add_rvalue_reference<R>::type is R&&)
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You gave (IMHO) the easiest to understand answer, so i'm accepting yours. Thanks for clearing this up for me. –  Aaron Apr 24 '13 at 14:30

This is because of the way type deduction is defined, and it is only related to perfect forwarding in the sense that the result of std::forward<>() is an rvalue if an rvalue reference is passed, and an lvalue if an lvalue reference is passed.

But in general, when you do not have a reference to begin with, your T is not going to be deduced as a reference type (i.e. as A&, whatever A could be). If that was the case, as Yakk correctly points out in the comments, it would be impossible to write a function template that takes its arguments by value.

In particular, the reference collapsing rule you are referring to is defined in Paragraph 14.8.2.1/4 of the C++11 Standard:

If P is a reference type, the type referred to by P is used for type deduction. If P is an rvalue reference to a cv-unqualified template parameter and the argument is an lvalue, the type “lvalue reference to A” is used in place of A for type deduction. [ Example:

template <class T> int f(T&&);
template <class T> int g(const T&&);
int i;
int n1 = f(i); // calls f<int&>(int&)
int n2 = f(0); // calls f<int>(int&&)
int n3 = g(i); // error: would call g<int>(const int&&), which
// would bind an rvalue reference to an lvalue

—end example ]

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+1 Beat me to it with the quote. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 24 '13 at 13:12
    
Why might be useful as well. If template<typename T> void foo(T t) could deduce T=int&, it would be impossible to deduce a template function that took arguments by value, because there is always a valid reference type (be it T&&, T&, T const& or T const&&) for any argument. And on the other end, the ability for T in T&& to be deduced as a reference type makes perfect forwarding possible without writing 4 functions each time you want to do it. It does make it tricky to write a function that takes any type as an rvalue reference, however. –  Yakk Apr 24 '13 at 13:23
    
@Yakk: That's true. I will mention this with a reference to your comment. Thank you –  Andy Prowl Apr 24 '13 at 13:32

There are three general cases to consider when deducing template parameters like this.

  1. void foo(T x): this means "pass-by-value". It always deduces a type as appropriate to pass by value.

  2. void foo(T& x): this means "pass-by-lvalue-reference". It always deduces a type as appropriate to pass by lvalue reference.

  3. void foo(T&& x): this means "pass-by-reference". It always deduces a type as appropriate to pass by reference, which may be an lvalue reference or an rvalue reference.

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Relax, slow down, and breathe.

Template argument deduction is the central mechanism that you need to understand, and it's not totally trivial. When you say template <typename T> void foo(T), then T is always deduced as a non-reference type.

If you want a reference, you have to put a & on it: template <typename T> void foo(T&) will also deduce T as a non-reference-type, but foo now always expects an lvalue reference.

The final piece of magic comes from the new reference collapsing rules. When you say template <typename T> void foo(T&&), then two things can happen:

  • You call foo with an rvalue, e.g. foo(Bar()). Then T is deduced as Bar, and foo takes an rvalue reference to Bar, i.e. a Bar&&.

  • You call foo with an lvalue, e.g. Bar x; foo(x);. Now the only thing foo can take is an lvalue reference. This requires T to be deduced as Bar&, since T&& == Bar& && == Bar&, due to the collapsing rules.

Only this final template is able to accept both lvalues and rvalues. This is why it is sometimes called "universal reference"; but remember that it's not the reference that matters, but the template argument deduction. Using std::forward<T> allows you to pass on the argument with the same value category that you received.

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