Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a SQL table with the following structure:

id Integer, (represents a userId)
version Integer,
attribute varchar(50)

So some sample rows are:

4, 1, 'test1'
4, 2, 'test2'
4, 3, 'test3'

I need to generate output in the following format:

4, 1, 'test1', 'test1'
4, 2, 'test2', 'test1'
4, 3, 'test3', 'test2'

So the format of my output would be:

id Integer,
version Integer,
attribute_current varchar,
attribute_old varchar

I already tried the following:

select versionTest.id, versionTest.version, versionTest.attribute, maxVersionTest.attribute
from versionTest
inner join
versionTest maxVersionTest
ON
versionTest.id = versionTest.id
AND
versionTest.version = 
(Select max(version) currentMaxVersion 
from versionTest maxRow
where maxRow.id = id);

The above query executes, but returns incorrect results. It only returns the largest version instead of returning rows for all versions.

Any ideas about how I should fix my query to produce the correct results? Thanks!

Note - The version numbers are not guaranteed to be sequential starting at 1. My actual database has some unusual version numbers (i.e. user 7 has version 3 and 15 with no versions 4, 5, 6, etc...).

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT a.*, COALESCE(b.attribute,a.attribute) attribute_old
  FROM
     ( SELECT x.*
            , COUNT(*) rank 
         FROM versiontest x 
         JOIN versiontest y 
           ON y.id = x.id 
          AND y.version <= x.version 
        GROUP 
           BY x.id
            , x.version
     ) a
  LEFT
  JOIN
     ( SELECT x.*
            , COUNT(*) rank 
         FROM versiontest x 
         JOIN versiontest y 
           ON y.id = x.id 
          AND y.version <= x.version 
        GROUP 
           BY x.id
            , x.version
     ) b
    ON b.id = a.id 
   AND b.rank = a.rank-1;

Sample output (DEMO):

+----+---------+-----------+------+---------------+
| id | version | attribute | rank | attribute_old |
+----+---------+-----------+------+---------------+
|  4 |       1 | test1     |    1 | test1         |
|  4 |       5 | test2     |    2 | test1         |
|  4 |       7 | test3     |    3 | test2         |
|  5 |       2 | test3     |    1 | test3         |
|  5 |       3 | test4     |    2 | test3         |
|  5 |       8 | test5     |    3 | test4         |
+----+---------+-----------+------+---------------+
share|improve this answer
add comment

Since you have mentioned that:

The version numbers are not guaranteed to be sequential starting at 1. My actual database has some unusual version numbers (i.e. user 7 has version 3 and 15 with no versions 4, 5, 6, etc...)

MySQL doesn't support window functions like any other RDBMS does, you can still simulate on how you can create a sequential numbers and used as the linking column to get the previous rows. Ex,

SELECT  a.ID, a.Version, a.attribute attribute_new,
        COALESCE(b.attribute, a.attribute) attribute_old
FROM
        (
            SELECT  ID, version, attribute,
                    @r1 := @r1 + 1 rn
            FROM    TableName, (SELECT @r1 := 0) b
            WHERE   ID = 4
            ORDER   BY version
        ) a
        LEFT JOIN
        (
            SELECT  ID, version, attribute,
                    @r2 := @r2 + 1 rn
            FROM    TableName, (SELECT @r2 := 0) b
            WHERE   ID = 4
            ORDER   BY version
        ) b ON a.rn = b.rn + 1
share|improve this answer
1  
This would work if OP is querying for a single ID –  Andomar Apr 24 '13 at 13:19
    
But could easily be adapted to work with multiple ids –  Strawberry Apr 24 '13 at 13:22
    
@Andomar right. –  John Woo Apr 24 '13 at 13:23
add comment

If version numbers always increase by 1, you could:

select  cur.id
,       cur.version
,       cur.attribute
,       coalesce(prev.attribute, cur.attribute)
from    versionTest
left join
        versionTest prev
on      prev.id = cur.id
        and prev.version = cur.version + 1
share|improve this answer
1  
But they don't. The OP said so. –  Strawberry Apr 24 '13 at 13:18
    
"Note - The version numbers are not guaranteed to be sequential starting at 1." –  mellamokb Apr 24 '13 at 13:18
add comment

You could try...

SELECT ID,
       VERSION,
       ATTRIBUTE,
       (SELECT ATTRIBUTE
            FROM VERSIONTEST V3
            WHERE V3.ID = V1.ID AND
                  V3.VERSION = (SELECT MAX(VERSION)
                                    FROM VERSIONTEST V2
                                    WHERE V2.ID = V1.ID AND
                                          V2.VERSION < V1.VERSION)) AS PREVIOUSATTRIBUTE
    FROM VERSIONTEST V1;

provided the version values are in numerical order.

share|improve this answer
    
This gets the previous version number, but not the previous version of the actual attribute: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/defc0/8 –  mellamokb Apr 24 '13 at 13:41
    
@mellamokb, sorry, misread the question. –  Brian Hooper Apr 24 '13 at 13:47
add comment

I think the easiest way to express this is with a correlated subquery:

select id, version, attribute as attribute_current,
       (select attribute
        from VersionTest vt2
        where vt2.id = vt.id and vt2.version < vt.version
        order by vt2.version
        limit 1
       ) as attribute_prev
from VersionTest vt

This version would put in NULL as the prev value for the first row. If you really want it repeated:

select id, version, attribute as attribute_current,
       coalesce((select attribute
                 from VersionTest vt2
                 where vt2.id = vt.id and vt2.version < vt.version
                 order by vt2.version
                 limit 1
                ), vt.attribute
               ) as attribute_prev
from VersionTest vt
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.