Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've been refactoring some bash code, and stumbled upon this bash notation:

"${string_a:-string_b}"

I've played a little with this on the command line:

$ echo "${string_a:-string_b}"
string_b
$ export string_a=string_a_value
$ echo "${string_a:-string_b}"
string_a_value

I seems that the {a:-b} notation returns the value of variable a if it is defined, or the string b otherwise.

Where can I find a more formal definition for this operator?

share|improve this question
    
I like this reference card: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/refcards.html # Table B-4. Parameter Substitution and Expansion –  fedorqui Apr 24 '13 at 13:37
    
Great, pass it as an answer and I will accept it. –  Adam Matan Apr 24 '13 at 13:39
1  
@fedorqui your comment answers the question Where can I find a more formal definition for this operator?, I think it could go to answer. –  Kent Apr 24 '13 at 13:40
    
Seemed to be so short info for an answer, but I just did it. –  fedorqui Apr 24 '13 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Peer pressure, I post my comment as an answer : )

I like this reference card: Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide , specifically in your case it will be useful "# Table B-4. Parameter Substitution and Expansion".

I do not copy any issue they indicate not to violate any copyright. Just find all information there.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the last sentence. tldp.org/LDP-COPYRIGHT.html –  Kent Apr 24 '13 at 13:48

You can access bash documentation using man bash. To search type /

${parameter:-word}

Use Default Values. If parameter is unset or null, the expansion of word is substituted. Otherwise, the value of parameter is substituted.

share|improve this answer
1  
Funny that this operator ha no name. –  Adam Matan Apr 24 '13 at 13:43

Another useful link is the Shell Parameter Expansion section in the Bash Reference Manual. The :- operator is defined as:

${parameter:-word} If parameter is unset or null, the expansion of word is substituted. Otherwise, the value of parameter is substituted.

By the way, bash features three similar operators ${parameter:=word}, ${parameter:?word} and ${parameter:+word}, defined in that section.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.