Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am working with some programming problems which require the use of trigonometric functions. Unfortunately, the functions in the math.h library seem to be inaccurate. Here is an example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>    
int main() {
  double a, b, c, d;
  a = sin(0.0);
  b = sin(90.0);
  c = cos(0.0);
  d = cos(90.0);
  printf("A = %lf\nB = %lf\nC = %lf\nD = %lf\n", a, b, c, d);
  return (0);
}

OUTPUT:

A = 0.000000
B = 0.893997
C = 1.000000
D = -0.448074

So is there any way to make these functions accurate? Or do I have to make my own functions using series?

I googled and so far could not find any way to make the functions accurate but using series.

share|improve this question
6  
Radians......... – Martin James Apr 24 '13 at 13:54
4  
Don't pass degrees to those trigonometric functions. Divide degree by 180 and multiply with pi. – Bryan Olivier Apr 24 '13 at 13:55
    
OHHHHHHH RIGHT!!!!!!!! Now I get it (never was good at trigonometry). Thanks :D :D :D – lonekingc4 Apr 24 '13 at 14:04
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Functions sin() and cos() expect radians. They are usually “faithful”, that is, they produce results within 1ULP of the mathematical result, at least for arguments up to a couple of thousands.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>    
int main() {
  double a, b, c, d;
  a = sin(0.0);
  b = sin(0.5 * 3.1415926535897932);
  c = cos(0.0);
  d = cos(0.5 * 3.1415926535897932);
  printf("A = %lf\nB = %lf\nC = %lf\nD = %lf\n", a, b, c, d);
  return (0);
}

A = 0.000000
B = 1.000000
C = 1.000000
D = 0.000000

EDITED TO ADD:

Camilo Martinez points out that “Unit in the Last Place” is a bit of a specialized notion. In simpler terms, there are a finite number of double values, denser around zero:

++-+-+-+---+---+-------+---------------+-------------------------------+--

The exact trigonometric value you are computing almost always falls in-between two of these doubles (the only exceptions are sin(0.0) = 0.0 and cos(0.0) = 1.0):

++-+-+-+---+---+-------+---------------+-------------------------------+--
                       |    ^          |
                     lower  |       upper
                     double |       double
                            |
                   exact (mathematical) result

Most libraries provide functions that will, in normal circumstances, give you the double immediately above the exact result or immediately below the mathematical result. This is pretty good considering the difficulty of the question.

Some libraries provide functions that will give you the double nearest to the exact result, for all inputs (even 1E21). This is an astounding result. Until relatively recently this could only be obtained at the cost of expensive computations, but nowadays, you can even obtain this sort of result nearly as fast as with the less accurate functions of the past.

Finally, sometimes you are not even applying sin() or cos() to the number you would like to, but only to its nearest double approximation. This is the case in your example once fixed: you would like to apply sin() and cos() to π/2, but you can't, because π/2 is not representable as a double. You have to apply them to the nearest available double instead (this is what the fixed program does).

Such inaccuracies can compound. The process by which they do have given floating-point computations a bad reputation, but actually, the way floating-point inaccuracies compound is very predictable and can be taken into account when writing programs that use floating-point.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, of course this is all floating-point with all of the baggage that has when it comes to "being accurate". – unwind Apr 24 '13 at 14:00
2  
@unwind The implementation of elementary floating-point functions such as sin() and cos() is a problem that has been very well studied, with very efficient algorithms now available. The mathematical sine or cosine of a rational number other than zero is never a rational number, so any fundamental inaccuracy is a failure of all human systems to represent numbers, and not just IEEE 754. – Pascal Cuoq Apr 24 '13 at 14:02

If you really need to work in degrees and have correct results, the standard trigonometric functions are not sufficient. For instance, cos(90*M_PI/180) will not yield 0.0. The error is probably less than 1ulp except when the correct result is zero (or maybe very close to zero), so you might just decide to be happy with using them anyway. To get better results, you'd need to adapt the existing algorithms to work in degrees (in some ways this will be easier since argument-reduction, one of the hardest parts of implementing the trig functions, is trivial in degrees) and do some numerical analysis to ensure you're within the error bounds you want.

A quick fix-up for working in degrees would be to just special-case multiples of 30 (where all the exact results fall) and call cos(x*M_PI/180), etc. for all other values. This won't be perfect but at least it will avoid introducing messy inexactness at points that should be exact.

share|improve this answer
1  
crlibm has functions cospi() and sinpi() (for x↦cos(πx) and x↦sin(πx)) that can be used to build functions that are correctly rounded for small multiples of 45 (but unfortunately not 30). – Pascal Cuoq Apr 24 '13 at 15:47
    
Interesting. And unfortunate that it doesn't cover this case. – R.. Apr 24 '13 at 16:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.