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I have an sample program as shown.

I want my ArrayList symbolsPresent to be initialized with some predefined symbols: ONE, TWO, THREE, and FOUR.

symbolsPresent.add("ONE");
symbolsPresent.add("TWO");
symbolsPresent.add("THREE");
symbolsPresent.add("FOUR");

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Test {

    private ArrayList<String> symbolsPresent = new ArrayList<String>();

    public ArrayList<String> getSymbolsPresent() {
        return symbolsPresent;
    }

    public void setSymbolsPresent(ArrayList<String> symbolsPresent) {
        this.symbolsPresent = symbolsPresent;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {    
        Test t = new Test();
        System.out.println("Symbols Present is" + t.symbolsPresent);

    }    
}

Is that possible?

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2  
Add them in a Constructor. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 24 '13 at 14:41
    
Will this help? stackoverflow.com/questions/1005073/… –  Jops Apr 24 '13 at 14:43
1  
better fit for an enum here? –  Ajay George Apr 24 '13 at 14:47
1  
May be a duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1005073/… –  Aman Deep Gautam Feb 4 '14 at 0:55

8 Answers 8

try this

new String[] {"One","Two","Three","Four"} 

or

List<String> places = Arrays.asList("One", "Two", "Three");

ARRAYS

share|improve this answer
    
good solution, asList(...) returns new ArrayList<>(a) like the question's author requested –  cahen Apr 24 '13 at 14:47
1  
@CarlosHenriqueRodriguez asList(...) returns List<E> not ArrayList<E> –  PermGenError Apr 24 '13 at 14:55
    
@PermGenError List is the return type, the method returns ArrayList. It's not java.util.ArrayList, it's an internal class with the same behavior –  cahen Apr 24 '13 at 14:59
    
The list returned by Arrays.asList(T...) is capped in size to the size of the array supplied in the constructor. That may or may not be an issue, depending on usage. –  Dilum Ranatunga Apr 24 '13 at 14:59

Double brace initialization is an option:

List<String> symbolsPresent = new ArrayList<String>() {{
   add("ONE");
   add("TWO");
   add("THREE");
   add("FOUR");
}};

Note that the String generic type argument is necessary in the assigned expression as indicated by JLS §15.9

It is a compile-time error if a class instance creation expression declares an anonymous class using the "<>" form for the class's type arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting anonymous innterclass! –  Ryan Apr 24 '13 at 14:52
    
If you add an object that was defined outside of this structure, you'll need to declare it final in order for it to compile. Read this answer if you want to know why. –  Aaron Mahan May 22 '14 at 13:42
    
There's also a performance penalty, although it's significance is debatable. –  Aaron Mahan May 22 '14 at 13:50
    
this is cool, but in Java 7 you can avoid specifying the type in the initialization: here docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… –  Rose Jul 7 at 21:14
    
@Rose that link only details standard List initialization, i.e. no anonymous inner class with values being added :) –  Reimeus Jul 7 at 21:43

How about using overloaded ArrayList constructor.

 private ArrayList<String> symbolsPresent = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"One","Two","Three","Four"}));
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2  
wouldn't Arrays.asList() alone do the job? –  cahen Apr 24 '13 at 14:49
2  
@CarlosHenriqueRodriguez it would, but then you will have to have List<String> on the left side. :) –  PermGenError Apr 24 '13 at 14:54
    
Note that you can use the var-args syntax with Java 5 and later. –  Dilum Ranatunga Apr 24 '13 at 15:00

You can also use the varargs syntax to make your code cleaner:

Use the overloaded constructor:

ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c"));

Subclass ArrayList in a utils module:

public class MyArrayList<T> extends ArrayList<T> {
    public MyArrayList(T... values) {
        super(Arrays.asList(values));
    }
}

ArrayList<String> list = new MyArrayList<String>("a", "b", "c");

Or have a static factory method (my preferred approach):

public class Utils {
  public static <T> ArrayList<T> asArrayList(T... values) {
    return new ArrayList<T>(Arrays.asList(values));
  }
}

ArrayList<String> list = Utils.asArrayList("a", "b", "c");
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Personnaly I like to do all the initialisations in the constructor

public Test()
{
  symbolsPresent = new ArrayList<String>();
  symbolsPresent.add("ONE");
  symbolsPresent.add("TWO");
  symbolsPresent.add("THREE");
  symbolsPresent.add("FOUR");
}

Edit : It is a choice of course and others prefer to initialize in the declaration. Both are valid, I have choosen the constructor because all type of initialitions are possible there (if you need a loop or parameters, ...). However I initialize the constants in the declaration on the top on the source.
The most important is to follow a rule that you like and be consistent in our classes.

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Also, if you want to enforce the List to be read-only (throws a UnsupportedOperationException if modified):

List<String> places = Collections.unmodifiableList(Arrays.asList("One", "Two", "Three"));

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I would suggest to use Arrays.asList() for single line initialization. For different ways of declaring and initializing a List you can also refer Initialization of ArrayList in Java

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I use a generic class that inherit from ArrayList and implement a constructor with a parameter with variable number or arguments :

public class MyArrayList<T> extends ArrayList<T> {
    public MyArrayList(T...items){
        for (T item : items) {
            this.add(item);
        }
    }
}

Example:

MyArrayList<String>myArrayList=new MyArrayList<String>("s1","s2","s2");
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