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After reading the Object.create document. I did some test for it . Here is my code . please review it.

function Shape() {
  this.x = 0;
  this.y = 0;
}

Shape.prototype.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle=Object.create(Shape);

Rectangle.move(); //?? why move function is not found ?

As the document says Object.create(proto[,propertiesObject]); proto should be the prototype of the newly-created object. So, Rectangle.prototype should be equal with the Shape. but actually it is not. Apparently I didn't understand this part of document. and I still found Rectangle.__proto__==Shape is true. OK, Even Rectangle.__proto__==Shape is true , Why Rectangle can't find the move function? Is the move function not in the prototype chain?? I thought the move function is in the Rectangle.__proto__.prototype, It supposed to be found in the chain. Why can not? thanks.

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1  
I believe you wanted to use Object.create(Shape.prototype) instead –  Jan Dvorak Apr 24 '13 at 15:33
    
No, In my code . I just want to find out what happen to the Object.create(Shape); thanks. –  Joe.wang Apr 24 '13 at 15:34
1  
When You read from a link or document Read carefully. The document clearly says Rectangle.prototype = Object.create(Shape.prototype); the create method takes Protoype (Not class name or function) and Returns Prototype( not class name or function). –  rahul maindargi Apr 24 '13 at 15:36
    
@JanDvorak You mean Object.create(Shape); is not allowed ? –  Joe.wang Apr 24 '13 at 15:36
2  
Because you are never executing Shape and this does not refer to Shape itself. You would have to do Shape.stop = .... And for that matter, Shape does not even have to be a function. All that Object.create does is basically var obj = {}; obj.__proto__ = Shape;. So if obj.stop cannot be found, it will be looked up on obj.__proto__.stop, which is the same as Shape.stop. –  Felix Kling Apr 24 '13 at 16:18
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The prototype must be an actual object. In this case, you should pass Shape's prototype, not the Shape function.

function Shape() {
  this.x = 0;
  this.y = 0;
}

Shape.prototype.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle=Object.create(Shape.prototype, {a:1});

Rectangle.move(); // it will call now
Rectangle.a; // 1
Rectangle.x; // NaN ???
Rectangle.y; // NaN ???

Note that Object.create() is not the same as using the new keyword - that might be what you were looking for instead.

function Shape() {
  this.x = 0;
  this.y = 0;
}

Shape.prototype.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle=new Shape;

Rectangle.move(1,2); // works properly now
Rectangle.a; // undefined, we never made one
Rectangle.x; // 1
Rectangle.y; // 2

As Javascript actually looks up the constructor and its .prototype to find the prototype recursively, it won't look up Shape's prototype as it was not directly set nor was the new constructor used to create Rectangle:

function Shape() {
  this.x = 0;
  this.y = 0;
}

Shape.prototype.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle = Object.create(Shape);
Rectangle.constructor; // Function()
Rectangle.constructor.prototype; // That's Function.prototype
/* as you can see Shape.prototype is never touched by the prototype chain */

Rectangle.__proto__; // Shape(), not the prototype (doesn't have any direct properties on it)

Rectangle.move(1,2); // TypeError: Rectangle.move is not a function
Rectangle.a; // does not exist
Rectangle.x; // function never called on Rectangle, so also doesn't exist
Rectangle.y; // function never called on Rectangle, so also doesn't exist
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+1 Please think about the question in the comments below the question.thanks. –  Joe.wang Apr 24 '13 at 15:49
1  
@Joe.wang: added an example of the original for you. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 25 '13 at 0:46
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maybe this will help you to understand a little bit more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwYPG6vreJg&feature=player_detailpage#t=739s

Here he explains that it doesn't work same as you said. Your argument that

I thought the move function is in the Rectangle.__proto__.prototype

is correct. You can find move as Rectangle.__proto__.prototype.move but it doesn't implies that you can find it as Rectangle.move. Prototype chain is interrupted. I think that it is detaily described in the video.

Try to think about these parts of code:

function Shape() {
    this.x = 0;
    this.y = 0;
}

Shape.__proto__.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle=Object.create(Shape);

Rectangle.move();

or:

function Shape() {
    this.x = 0;
    this.y = 0;
}

Shape.prototype.move = function(x, y) {
    this.x += x;
    this.y += y;
    console.info("Shape moved.");
};

Rectangle=Object.create(Shape);

Rectangle.prototype.move();

(x and y are still incorrect in these cases, but you weren't asking about them ;) )

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