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When working with angles in degrees, I want to define the degree symbol (°) to be used as a postfix operator. Currently, I use this line (in GHCi):

let o = pi/180

and use it like this:

tan(11*o)

but I want to just go:

tan 11°

which is much clearer. The degree operator should have higher precedence than ‘tan’ and other functions.

The closest I've got is:

let (°) x _ = x*pi/180

used like this:

tan(11°0)

but the default precedence means the parens are still needed, and with the dummy number, this alternative is worse than what I currently use.

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8  
"The degree operator should have higher precedence than tan and other functions." <- That's not going to work, function application has the highest precedence by the language specification. – Daniel Fischer Apr 24 '13 at 15:42
    
Why don't you simply define a new numeric type (wrapping Double or whatever) with a newtype that represents degrees? Of course you'll have to pay some attention to the "modular" nature of degrees if you want to define equality, etc. – stephen tetley Apr 24 '13 at 16:50
    
Haskell is not the kind of language where you can make just anything compile the way you're used to writing it. Unlike Perl or even Python, Haskell's infix syntax is actually very trimmed-down and simple, it just happens to be so well-designed that even this simple basis allows for an astonishing lot of very efficient shorthands, to leave out many parens, and generally to make things quite readable. But the latter point is in part because there are these rather rigid parsing rules. – leftaroundabout Apr 24 '13 at 18:54

You can't, at least in Haskell as defined by the Report. There is, however, a GHC extension that allows postfix operators.

Unfortunately this doesn't give you everything you want; in particular, it still requires parentheses, as the unary negation operator often does.

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Check out fixity declarations, which allow you to change the precedence of infix operators. Be careful not to set the precedence too high, or other operators won't behave as expected.

For example:

infixl 7 °
(°) x _ = x*pi/180

Edit: ah, @Daniel Fischer's right - this won't work for your current needs because function application has the highest precedence

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