Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need to get the values 1 or 2 from the divs if they are pressed. I have made a script to set either to active when pressed, but I cannot seem to find out how to extract the value 1 if the first div is pressed. The HTML value attribute is only for input elements and in this case I want it on a div. How is this possible?

Example

<div class="booking_search_cat darkgrey active">
    <p>Group room</p>
</div>
<div class="booking_search_cat lightgrey">
    <p>Lecture room</p>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
I don't see 1 or 2 in your html. Where do you expect that to come from? the div's index? –  Kevin B Apr 24 '13 at 15:50
    
Why not use a button? Buttons are clickable DOM elements which have value attributes? –  cloakedninjas Apr 24 '13 at 15:52
    
I would not expect the value to come flying in, however the attribute value="someval" is not valid for divs. –  Richard Apr 24 '13 at 15:53
    
I'm glad to see you accepted my answer (thanks!), however I feel that my other answer might just be a better technique :) –  Lix Apr 24 '13 at 16:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could simply add a data-* attribute to the categories:

<div class="booking_search_cat darkgrey active" data-category="1">
    <p>Group room</p>
</div>
<div class="booking_search_cat lightgrey" data-category="2">
    <p>Lecture room</p>
</div>

Now all you have to do is extract that info on the click event.

$('.booking_search_cat').on('click',function(){
  var categoryId = $(this).data('category');
  console.log(categoryId);
});
share|improve this answer

Something like this should do the trick:

<div class="booking_search_cat darkgrey active" data-value='group_room'>
  <p>Group room</p>
</div>

<div class="booking_search_cat lightgrey" data-value='lecture_room'>
  <p>Lecture room</p>
</div>

<script type='text/javascript'>
  var $booking_search = $(".booking_search_cat");

  $booking_search.click(function(){
    $booking_search.filter(".active").removeClass("active");
    $(this).addClass("active");

    alert("The value is "+$(this).data("value"));
  });
</script>
share|improve this answer

You can use the data-val attribute. Fiddle here.

<div class="booking_search_cat darkgrey active" data-val='1'>
    <p>Group room</p>
</div>
<div class="booking_search_cat lightgrey" data-val='2'>
    <p>Lecture room</p>
</div>

$(".booking_search_cat").click(function(){
    alert($(this).data('val'));
});
share|improve this answer

Use the data attribute

<div data-val="1" ...

and

$(".bookingsearch").on("click",function() {
  $.post("someserverthing",{parm:$(this).data("val")},function(data) {
    alert(data);
  }
});
share|improve this answer

You could use the index() function to determine which element was clicked -

$('.booking_search_cat').on('click',function(){
  var categoryId = $(this).index('.booking_search_cat');
  console.log(categoryId);
});

The index() function returns (as the name states) the index of the element. The documentation has this to say about the return value -

If a selector string is passed as an argument, .index() returns an integer indicating the position of the first element within the jQuery object relative to the elements matched by the selector. If the element is not found, .index() will return -1.

Here is a very simple demo on jsFiddle

share|improve this answer

You could use .index() in your click handler to determine which (in the order of DOM nodes) was clicked:

$('.booking_search_cat').on('click', function() {
    alert($(this).index('.booking_search_cat')); // 0 if first was clicked, 1 if second was clicked, etc.
});

Demo Here

EDIT: As pointed out by Lix, .index() needs a selector so as to ignore siblings when computing the index. Demo link updated.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to give a selector to the index function other wise it will take into consideration all sibling elements and not just the .booking_search_cat elements. –  Lix Apr 24 '13 at 22:19
    
@Lix Thanks, didn't catch that .index() could accept selectors to effectively ignore siblings. Given that, I'm leaning towards the data method as outlined in other answers as a more effective solution instead of this. –  ajp15243 Apr 25 '13 at 3:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.