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So I currently have a triangle mesh (made with bezier curves) that can be changed dynamically. The problem I am facing is trying to figure out which triangles to actually render based on where the camera is at. The camera always looks towards the origin (0,0,0) so I am finding each triangle's normal and taking it's dotproduct with my camera vector. Then, based on the result, determining if the triangle should be "visible" or not.

The following is the code I am using for the calculations:

void bezier_plane()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 20; j++) {
            grid[i][j].x = 0;
            grid[i][j].y = 0;
            grid[i][j].z = 0;
        }
    }
    //Creates the grid using bezier calculation
    CalcBezier();
    for (int i = 0; i < 19; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 19; j++) {
            Vector p1, p2, p3, normal;
            p1.x = grid[i+1][j+1].x - grid[i][j].x; p1.y = grid[i+1][j+1].y - grid[i][j].y; p1.z = grid[i+1][j+1].z - grid[i][j].z;
            p2.x = grid[i+1][j].x - grid[i][j].x;   p1.y = grid[i+1][j].y - grid[i][j].y; p1.z = grid[i+1][j].z - grid[i][j].z;

            normal = CalcNormal(p2, p1);
            double first = dotproduct(normal, Camera);

            p3.x = grid[i][j+1].x - grid[i][j].x; p3.y = grid[i][j+1].y - grid[i][j].y; p3.z = grid[i][j+1].z - grid[i][j].z;

            normal = CalcNormal(p1, p3);
            double second = dotproduct(normal, Camera);

            if (first < 0 && second < 0) {
                glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT_AND_BACK, GL_LINE);
                glColor3f(0, 1, 0);
                glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i][j].x, grid[i][j].y, grid[i][j].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i][j+1].x, grid[i][j+1].y, grid[i][j+1].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i+1][j].x, grid[i+1][j].y, grid[i+1][j].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i+1][j+1].x, grid[i+1][j+1].y, grid[i+1][j+1].z);
                glEnd();
            } else if (first < 0 && second > 0) {
                glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT_AND_BACK, GL_LINE);
                glColor3f(0, 1, 0);
                glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i][j].x, grid[i][j].y, grid[i][j].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i+1][j].x, grid[i+1][j].y, grid[i+1][j].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i+1][j+1].x, grid[i+1][j+1].y, grid[i+1][j+1].z);
                glEnd();
            } else if (first > 0 && second < 0) {
                glPolygonMode(GL_FRONT_AND_BACK, GL_LINE);
                glColor3f(0, 1, 0);
                glBegin(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i][j].x, grid[i][j].y, grid[i][j].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i][j+1].x, grid[i][j+1].y, grid[i][j+1].z);
                    glVertex3f(grid[i+1][j+1].x, grid[i+1][j+1].y, grid[i+1][j+1].z);
                glEnd();
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is CalcNormal:

   Vector CalcNormal(Vector p1, Vector p2)
{
    Vector normal;
    normal.x = (p1.y * p2.z) - (p1.z * p2.y);
    normal.y = (p1.z * p2.x) - (p1.x * p2.z);
    normal.z = (p1.x * p2. y) - (p1.y * p2.x);
    return normal;
}

double dotproduct(Vector normal, Vector Camera)
{
    return (normal.x * Camera.x + normal.y * Camera.y + normal.z + Camera.z);
}

Right now, my code gives this result. The part circled in red should NOT be displayed (I believe, the triangles in back). result

share|improve this question
    
I highly recommend this book. It explains quite well an approach for what you are trying to do. –  Styne666 Apr 24 '13 at 16:48
    
I think what you're trying to achieve is backface culling, which OpenGL can do for you by enabling GL_CULL_FACE –  Robert J. Apr 24 '13 at 17:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach of testing the normals will still have visual artifacts, because triangles facing the camera could also be obscured. Imagine if that bulge were at the corner closest to the camera.

You will also have triangles that are partially visible and partially obscured.

A solution that would work on the pixel level would be:

  • glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST)​
  • Draw the surface first with solid triangles instead of wire frame
  • Clear the frame buffer, but not the depth buffer
  • Now draw your entire scene. The depth buffer will prevent obscured pixels from being drawn
share|improve this answer
    
So I would be drawing the entire scene twice? First time, draw as solid triangles and the 2nd time draw as wireframe? –  Kinru Apr 24 '13 at 16:29
    
@Kinru Whatever could block other triangles (only the mesh) would be rendered twice, yes. That is a commonly-used technique. I believe a single-pass solution would require writing custom shaders. It's up to you to decide if you are up for that challenge. :) –  Drew Dormann Apr 24 '13 at 16:38
    
In your case, you might be able to create your own "depth buffer", because you have a rather simple surface. Draw the closest (near the lower edge of the picture) triangle and remember its boundaries. Then, draw the part of the next one that is outside the boundaries and exclude those parts from further drawing, too. I wonder if this is worth it though, and if your surface is always that simple. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Apr 24 '13 at 16:43

"Normal is a global variable" - could it be that that is already your problem? This looks like the worst application of global data I can think of! Instead, calling this thing crossproduct and returning a vector sounds like a good idea, no? Also, the dotproduct should take two vectors as parameter.

That said, your approach is sound. If you always have the same direction for the corners of triangles, the cross product of two sides will give you the normal. Further, if the angle between the normal and the view is less than 90 degrees, it looks away from the view and should be made invisible. Therefore the problem must be in your implementation, and using global state that could be stored in CPU registers anyway is the first thing you should fix.

Edit: You could use operator overloading to the reader's advantage here:

class Vector
{
   Vector(){}
   Vector(scalar x0, scalar y0, scalar z0): x(x0), y(y0), z(z0){}
   float x, y, z;
};

Vector operator-(Vector const& v1, Vector const& v2)
{
   return Vector(v1.x - v2.x, v1.y - v2.y, v1.z - v2.z);
}

Then, start the loop body like this:

Vector const point1 = grid[i, j];
Vector const point2 = grid[i + 1, j];
Vector const point3 = grid[i, j + 1];
Vector const point4 = grid[i + 1, j + 1];

These will easily be optimized out by the compiler, while they ease debugging and improve readability. Also note that they are constant, which makes the compiler verify that you don't change them accidentally. Then, you compute the two normals of the two triangles:

Vector const norm1 = crossproduct(point2 - point1, point3 - point1);
Vector const norm2 = crossproduct(point4 - point2, point4 - point3);

Then, you can check the dotproduct for visibility:

bool const visible1 = dotproduct(norm1, Camera) > 0;
bool const visible2 = dotproduct(norm2, Camera) > 0;

Lastly, you could overload glVertex3f() to take a Vector, but I'd stay away from overloading other libraries' functions.

share|improve this answer
    
There had been a reason previously why I was using normal as a global variable, but I changed my code a while ago (and just left it like that, which was silly). I updated my code now (put it in my original question) without using a global variable. However, the result has not changed. –  Kinru Apr 24 '13 at 16:17

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