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How can the wait() and notify() methods be called on Objects that are not Threads? That doesn't really make sense, does it?

Surely, it must make sense, however, because the two methods are available for all Java objects. Can someone provide an explanation? I am having trouble understanding how to communicate between threads using wait() and notify().

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5  
Any Object can be used as a monitor Object, hence the Object class Object implements these methods. –  Reimeus Apr 24 '13 at 16:21
1  
I think that their presence in Object is more of like a "marker" , Thread extends Object –  Coffee Apr 24 '13 at 16:21
5  
wait(), notify(), and notifyAll() are only valid when they are called from within a synchronized method or a synchronized block. –  Eng.Fouad Apr 24 '13 at 16:22

6 Answers 6

You can use wait() and notify() to synchronise your logic. As an example

synchronize(lock) {
    lock.wait(); // Will block until lock.notify() is called on another thread.
}

// Somewhere else...
...
synchronize(lock) {
    lock.notify(); // Will wake up lock.wait()
}

with lock being the class member Object lock = new Object();

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3  
A simple use of this sort of thing is a message producer/consumer Where consumer.wait(); until producer.notify(); –  Christian Bongiorno Apr 24 '13 at 20:50
2  
I think this is one of the best examples: javamex.com/tutorials/wait_notify_how_to.shtml –  Alex Mills Apr 29 '13 at 2:30

You can stop your thread for time as you want using static Thread class method sleep().

public class Main {
    //some code here

    //Thre thread will sleep for 5sec.
    Thread.sleep(5000);   
}

If you want to stop some objects you need to call this method's within syncronized blocks.

public class Main {

//some code

public void waitObject(Object object) throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized(object) {
        object.wait();
    }
}

public void notifyObject(Object object) throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized(object) {
        object.notify();
    }
}

}

P.S. I'm sory if I wrong understand your question (English is not my native)

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1  
thanks, I like this explanation: javamex.com/tutorials/wait_notify_how_to.shtml –  Alex Mills Apr 29 '13 at 2:28

Locks are different from threads. The lock is on the data structure being protected. The threads are the things accessing the data structure. The locks are on the data structure object in order to keep the threads from accessing the data structure in an unsafe way.

Any object can be used as an intrinsic lock (meaning used in conjunction with synchronized). This way you can guard access to any object by adding the synchronized modifier to the methods that access the shared data. (Not that it's a good idea, because that allows any thread that can access the object to acquire its lock, even if it's not calling any methods on it; it's better to keep the lock as a private member of the data structure being locked, so that access to it is limited.)

wait and notify are called on objects that are being used as locks. The lock is a shared communication point. When a thread that has a lock calls notifyAll on it, the other threads waiting on that same lock get notified. When a thread that has a lock calls notify on it, one of the threads waiting on that same lock gets notified.

See the Oracle tutorial on guarded blocks, the Drop class is the shared data structure, threads using the Producer and Consumer runnables are accessing it. Locking on the Drop object controls how the threads access the Drop object's data.

Threads get used as locks in the JVM implementation, application developers are advised to avoid using threads as locks. For instance, the documentation for Thread.join says:

This implementation uses a loop of this.wait calls conditioned on this.isAlive. As a thread terminates the this.notifyAll method is invoked. It is recommended that applications not use wait, notify, or notifyAll on Thread instances.

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In Java all Object implements these two methods, obviously if there are not a monitor those two methods are useless.

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When you put some code inside synchronized block:

 sychronized(lock){...}

a thread wanting to perform whatever is inside this block first acquires a lock on an object and only one thread at a time can execute the code locked on the same object. Any object can be used as a lock but you should be careful to choose the object relevant to the scope. For example when you have multiple threads adding something to the account and they all have some code responsible for that inside a block like:

sychronized(this){...}

then no synchronization takes place because they all locked on different object. Instead you should use an account object as the lock. Now consider that these threads have also method for withdrawing from an account. In this case a situation may occur where a thread wanting to withdraw something encounters an empty account. It should wait until there's some money and release the lock to other threads to avoid a deadlock. That's what wait and notify methods are for. In this example a thread that encounters an empty account releases the lock and waits for the signal from some thread that makes the deposit:

while(balance < amountToWithdraw){
    lock.wait();
}

When other thread deposits some money, it signals other threads waiting on the same lock. (of course, code responsible for making deposits and withdrawals has to be synchronized on the same lock for this to work and to prevent data corruption).

balance += amountToDeposit;
lock.signallAll;

As you see the methods wait and notify only make sense inside synchronized blocks or methods.

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"This method should only be called by a thread that is the owner of this object's monitor." So I think you must make sure there is a thread who is the monitor on the object.

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