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Been struggling with this for quite a while now, so I'm starting to think I have created an anti-pattern. Nevertheless, here goes;

//Register self
container.Register(Component.For<IWindsorContainer>().Instance(container));
//Register all
container.Register(Component.For<IService1>().ImplementedBy<Service1>());
container.Register(Component.For<IService2>().ImplementedBy<Service2>());
//etc

IService1
{
  //blabla
}
IService2 {IService1 Service1{get;}}

So IService1 and IService2 can be created without anything special. Starting at IService3, an IProject is involved.

IProject{}
//Resolve a service that, amongst other things, relies on an IProject
IProjectGet
{
    T Get<T>(IProject proj) 
        where T : class;
}
//Impl
ProjectGet : IProjectGet
{
    IWindsorContainer _cont;
    public ProjectGet(IWindsorContainer cont){_cont=cont}

    public T Get<T>(IProject proj)
    {
        //Resolve using the main (and only) container and pass the IProject
        return _cont.Resolve<T>(new {p = proj});
    }
}

This does not work, only the main service is resolved with the 'p = proj' and any other dependencies the main service has, that also rely on the project, cause an exception saying the project service was not found.

IService3 
{
    IService2 Service2{get;}
    IProjectGet ProjectGet{get;}
    IProjectLevelStuff SetActiveProject(IProject proj);
}
Service3 : IService3 
{
    IService2 Service2{get;private set;}
    IProjectGet ProjectGet{get;private set;}

    public Service3(IService2 s2, IProjectGet p)
    {
        ProjectGet = p;
        Service2 = s2;
    }

    public IProjectLevelStuff SetActiveProject(IProject proj)
    {
        return ProjectGet.Get<IProjectLevelStuff>(proj);
    }
}
ProjectLevelStuff : IProjectLevelStuff
{
    IProject Project{get;private set;}
    IService4 Service4 {get;private set;}

    public ProjectLevelStuff(IProject p, IService4)//etc.
}
IService4
{
    IService2 Service2{get;}
    IService5 Service5{get;}
    IService6 Service6{get;}
    IProject Project{get;}
}
IService5{IProject Project{get;}}
IService6{IProject Project{get;}}

This fails because only ProjectLevelStuff gets the IProject passed to it, and since IService4 and it's dependencies also need it, an exception is thrown. Even if this did work, I don't like it, because each service with a dependency on IProject is forced to call that parameter 'p' which I want to avoid.

I just want to keep on using the services I already had but this time add the IProject instance that was passed to our generic Get method as a resolvable dependency. I have found no way to copy the container and creating a new one and then adding the main one as a child does not change anything (dependency still missing). How is this done?

Castle Windsor does have a TypeFactory built in but it essentially does the same thing as what I'm already doing and does not solve anything. The only 'solution' I found is creating a new container and registering the types all over again but this time resolve them via the main container (except for the IProject of course).. it's a maintenance nightmare in the works.

UPDATE: I added some unit tests to my answer below that hopefully clears up some things

share|improve this question
1  
Hello Natli, It is a very BAD idea to pass the container inside the container. Maybe if you try to rewrite your code using the TypedFactory it might be easier for other to help you out. The current code is to complicated for me, but it seems that you will need a boundto or scoped lifestyle. –  Marwijn Apr 25 '13 at 7:34
    
@Marwijn Hey, I have reached a very unsatisfying solution but I'll add it as an answer to hopefully clear up some of the confusion. –  natli Apr 25 '13 at 13:46

2 Answers 2

please check if you could use the approach below using scopes:

[SetUp]
public void Setup()
{
    int counter = 0;

    _container = new WindsorContainer();
    _container.AddFacility<TypedFactoryFacility>();
    _container.Register(
        Component.For<IService1>().ImplementedBy<Service1>().LifestyleScoped(),
        Component.For<IService2>().ImplementedBy<Service2>().LifestyleScoped(),
        Component.For<IService3>().ImplementedBy<Service3>().LifestyleScoped(),
        Component.For<Class1>().LifestyleTransient(),
        Component.For<Class2>().LifestyleTransient(),
        Component.For<IProject>().ImplementedBy<Project>().LifestyleScoped().DynamicParameters((k, d) => d["name"] = "MyProjectName"+counter++)
        );
}

[Test]
public void TestClass1()
{
    using (_container.BeginScope())
    {
        Class1 object1 = _container.Resolve<Class1>();;
        var object2 = _container.Resolve<Class1>();
        Assert.AreNotSame(object1, object2);

        Assert.AreSame(object1.Service1, object2.Service1);
    }
}

[Test]
public void TestClass2()
{
    Class2 object1;
    using (_container.BeginScope())
    {
        object1 = _container.Resolve<Class2>();
        var object2 = _container.Resolve<Class2>();
        Assert.AreNotSame(object1, object2);

        Assert.AreSame(object1.Project, object2.Project);
        Assert.AreSame(object1.Service2.Project, object2.Service2.Project);
    }

    Class2 object3;
    using (_container.BeginScope())
    {
        object3 = _container.Resolve<Class2>();
    }

    Assert.AreNotSame(object1.Project, object3.Project);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to write that up, I had not come across LifestyleScoped before. In your code, the project name is automatically created for each scope. How do you intend to make this work in such a way that the service implementation can define what name it wants the project to have? –  natli Apr 30 '13 at 10:01
    
Why not use the service constructor for that ? –  Marwijn May 1 '13 at 14:51
    
Then how do I keep the LifestyleScoped? I have to pass the project name from the service to the container so it can new it up, meaning I'd lose the LifestyleScoped as it appears in your example. –  natli May 2 '13 at 14:49

For some strange (but probably valid) reason Windsor child-containers can access their Parent containers but not the other way around. This means that in order to use services registered in the main container from the new container, we have to set the Parent of the main container rather than that of the new container.

This is painfully inconvenient because a container can only have one Parent.

internal class ProjServices : IProjServices
{
    private readonly IKwProject _proj;
    private readonly IWindsorContainer _mainCont;

    public ProjServices(IKwProject proj, IWindsorContainer mainCont)
    {
        _mainCont = mainCont;
        _proj = proj;
    }

    public T Resolve<T>()
    {
        T rett;

        //Create new container
        var projCont = new WindsorContainer();
        //Register new service
        projCont.Register(Component.For<IKwProject>().Instance(_proj));

        //Set hierarchy
        lock (_mainCont)
        {
            projCont.AddChildContainer(UiContainer); //ui needs project, set parent to projCont
            UiContainer.AddChildContainer(_mainCont); //main needs ui, set parent to uiCont

            //Resolve using main, which now has access to UI and Project services
            try
            {
                rett = _mainCont.Resolve<T>();
            }
            finally
            {
                projCont.RemoveChildContainer(UiContainer);
                UiContainer.RemoveChildContainer(_mainCont);
            }
        }

        return rett;
    }

    private static readonly object UIContainerLock = new object();
    private static volatile IWindsorContainer _uiContainer;
    private static IWindsorContainer UiContainer
    {
        get
        {
            if(_uiContainer==null)
                lock(UIContainerLock)
                    if (_uiContainer == null)
                    {
                        //Register the UI services
                    }
            return _uiContainer;
        }
    }
}

And now if I wanted to use these new containers in even newer containers in the future I think I'd get stuck again due to the one-parent-only thing.... how do I properly do this, please?

UPDATE:

Unit Tests for VS 2010 and 2012:

ServiceTest.zip (798 KB) https://mega.co.nz/#!z4JxUDoI!UEnt3TCoMFVg-vXKEAaJrhzjxfhcvirsW2hv1XBnZCc

Or to copy&paste:

using System;
using Castle.MicroKernel.Registration;
using Castle.Windsor;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace ServiceTest
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A service that doesn't rely on anything else
    /// </summary>
    public interface IService1
    {
    }
    class Service1 : IService1
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The Project
    /// </summary>
    public interface IProject
    {
        string Name { get; }
    }
    public class Project : IProject
    {
        public Project(string name)
        {
            Name = name;
        }

        public string Name { get; private set; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// A Service that relies on a Project
    /// </summary>
    public interface IService2
    {
        IProject Project { get; }
        string GetProjectName();
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// The implementation shows it also relies on IService3
    /// </summary>
    public class Service2 : IService2
    {
        public Service2(IProject project, IService3 service3)
        {
            Project = project;
            Service3 = service3;
        }

        public IProject Project { get; private set; }
        public IService3 Service3 { get; private set; }

        public string GetProjectName()
        {
            return Project.Name;
        }
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// IService3 is a Service that also relies on the Project
    /// </summary>
    public interface IService3
    {
        IProject Project { get; }
    }
    public class Service3 : IService3
    {
        public Service3(IProject project)
        {
            Project = project;
        }

        public IProject Project { get; private set; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Class1 uses the service without any dependencies so it will be easy to resolve
    /// </summary>
    public class Class1
    {
        public Class1(IService1 service1)
        {
            Service1 = service1;
        }

        public IService1 Service1 { get; private set; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Class2 also uses that service, but it also relies on a Project ánd IService2
    ///  which as you know also relies on the Project and IService3 which also relies on 
    ///  the Project
    /// </summary>
    public class Class2
    {
        public Class2(IService1 service1, IProject project, IService2 service2)
        {
            Service1 = service1;
            Project = project;
            Service2 = service2;
        }

        public IProject Project { get; private set; }
        public IService1 Service1 { get; private set; }
        public IService2 Service2 { get; private set; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Set up the base services
    /// </summary>
    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTestBase
    {
        protected WindsorContainer Cont;

        [TestInitialize]
        public void BaseSetup()
        {
            Cont = new WindsorContainer();
            Cont.Register(Component.For<IService1>().ImplementedBy<Service1>().LifestyleTransient());
            Cont.Register(Component.For<IService2>().ImplementedBy<Service2>().LifestyleTransient());
            Cont.Register(Component.For<IService3>().ImplementedBy<Service3>().LifestyleTransient());

            Cont.Register(Component.For<Class1>().LifestyleTransient());
            Cont.Register(Component.For<Class2>().LifestyleTransient());
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void Class1_Resolves()
        {
            Cont.Resolve<Class1>();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Set up the base unit tests
    /// </summary>
    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTestClass2Base : UnitTestBase
    {
        protected void RunTest3Times(Func<string, IWindsorContainer> getContainer)
        {
            const string projNameBase = "MyProjectName";
            Func<int, string> getProjectName = i => projNameBase + i;

            for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            {
                var pName = getProjectName(i);
                GetClass2ForProject(getContainer(pName), pName);
            }
        }

        protected void GetClass2ForProject(IWindsorContainer cont, string projName)
        {
            var c2 = cont.Resolve<Class2>();

            Assert.IsTrue(c2.Project.Name == projName);
            Assert.IsTrue(c2.Service2.Project.Name == projName);
            Assert.IsTrue(c2.Service2.GetProjectName() == projName);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This will fail on the second request because we cannot 
    ///  overwrite the earlier registration. And iirc containers can't
    ///  be altered after the first resolve.
    /// </summary>
    [TestClass]
    public class Attempt_1 : UnitTestClass2Base
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void Class2_Resolves_Project_Scoped_Requests()
        {
            RunTest3Times(s =>
                {
                    Cont.Register(Component.For<IProject>().Instance(new Project(s)));
                    return Cont;
                });
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// It looks like we have to create a new container for every Project
    /// So now the question remains; how do we get to keep using the base IService implementations
    ///  in the container that is scoped for the IProject?
    /// </summary>
    [TestClass]
    public class Attempt_2 : UnitTestClass2Base
    {
        static IWindsorContainer CreateContainer(IProject p)
        {
            var ret = new WindsorContainer();
            ret.Register(Component.For<IProject>().Instance(p));
            return ret;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This will fail because the services in the main 
        ///  container can't access the IProject in the new container
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void Class2_Resolves_Project_Scoped_Requests_1()
        {
            RunTest3Times(s =>
            {
                //Add the project container as a Child to the Main container
                var projCont = CreateContainer(new Project(s));
                Cont.AddChildContainer(projCont);
                return Cont;
            });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Doing the previous approach the other way around works.
        /// But now we can only resolve one thing at a time
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void Class2_Resolves_Project_Scoped_Requests_2()
        {
            IWindsorContainer projCont = null;

            //Add the Main container as a Child to the project container
            // (in other words set the Parent of Main to Project)
            // and then resolve using the main container.
            //A container can only have one parent at a time so we can only
            // resolve one scoped thing at a time.
            RunTest3Times(s =>
                {
                    if (projCont != null)
                        projCont.RemoveChildContainer(Cont);

                    projCont = CreateContainer(new Project(s));
                    projCont.AddChildContainer(Cont);
                    return Cont;
                });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The only way around that issue seems to be to register all project-dependent 
        ///  services in the new container. Then re-register all original services
        ///  in the new container and pass the resolving on to the main container; 
        ///  a maintenance nightmare and especially painful for named registrions.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void Class2_Resolves_Project_Scoped_Requests_3()
        {
            Func<IProject, IWindsorContainer> createContainer2 = p =>
                {
                    var contNew = new WindsorContainer();

                    //Pass resolving of the non-dependent services on to the main container.
                    // this way it will respect it's lifestyle rules and not create new 
                    // instances of services we wanted to use as a singleton etc.
                    contNew.Register(Component.For<IService1>().UsingFactoryMethod(() => Cont.Resolve<IService1>()).LifestyleTransient());
                    contNew.Register(Component.For<Class1>().UsingFactoryMethod(() => Cont.Resolve<Class1>()).LifestyleTransient());

                    //Register the dependent services directly in the new container so they can access the project
                    contNew.Register(Component.For<IService2>().ImplementedBy<Service2>().LifestyleTransient());
                    contNew.Register(Component.For<IService3>().ImplementedBy<Service3>().LifestyleTransient());
                    contNew.Register(Component.For<Class2>().LifestyleTransient());

                    contNew.Register(Component.For<IProject>().Instance(p));

                    return contNew;
                };

            RunTest3Times(s =>
            {
                var projCont = createContainer2(new Project(s));
                return projCont;
            });
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It remains unclear to me what you are trying to achieve. Child containers are and advanced feature of windsor, usually not required. ProjServices exposed an Resolve<T> method, which should not be required. It could be that you are using the container as a service locator. Could you write a simple test that shows what you want to achieve. –  Marwijn Apr 26 '13 at 4:42
    
I added the unit tests, thanks ;) –  natli Apr 26 '13 at 12:14

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