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I know this is probably a really noob question but I can't see what the problem here is returning the variable pic_real_width.

I presume it's a scope thing, but other than making it global (can't do that) I'm unsure how i can set and return it.

Thanks in advance,

function get_real_width(img){
    var pic_real_width;
    $("<img/>") // Make in memory copy of image to avoid css issues
      .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"))
      .load(function() {
         pic_real_width = this.width;   
         console.log( pic_real_width ); // returns a number
       });
   console.log( pic_real_width ); //returns undefined
   return pic_real_width;
}
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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, Mohammad Adil, undefined, Code Magician, Hinata Mar 8 at 5:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Look up async vs sync. –  Rob W Apr 24 '13 at 16:52
    
the second console.log(pic_real_width) is running before the .load() function is. put your return statement at the end of the load function. –  PlantTheIdea Apr 24 '13 at 16:53
1  
Asynchronous task is asyncronous ! –  jAndy Apr 24 '13 at 16:53
    
try console.log(this.width) first and check if it's defined –  razzak Apr 24 '13 at 16:54
    
It's has something to do with blocking and non-blocking operations, I think. The .load() method is non-blocking so it allows the lines of code after it to execute even though it is still not executed. That's why you're getting undefined. –  Arnelle Balane Apr 24 '13 at 16:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simply, the function you pass to load is async, and async functions have a different context of the pattern function.

In the example, a solution can't be encountered (i can't find a solution for it now), but, you can refactor your code to get the "real width" of the image asynchronous, just passing other callback that's called inside the function passed to load().

Something such as:

function get_real_width(img, callback){
    var pic_real_width;
    $("<img/>") // Make in memory copy of image to avoid css issues
    .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"))
    .load(function() {
        pic_real_width = this.width;   
        callback( img, pic_real_width ); // Call the function with the number expected
    });
}

As it just get the width and return it to a function.

But, i know, it cannot be used in some situation.

Good luck.

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Your function will have exited before the .load call is done, therefore there is no value to return.

The 'pic_real_width' is set during the callback function for the load, but meanwhile, your function continues to execute while it waits for the .load to finish, and therefore exits, before the value has been set.

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In English, this is what get_real_width is currently doing:

  1. Create a local variable called pic_real_width.
  2. Create a new <img/> element with the copied src attribute, and once that <img/> element is loaded, then run the inner function. The "once/then" part is what everyone is describing as asynchronous, since you don't know or have any control over when this is going to happen relative to the rest of your code.
  3. Immediately log and return pic_real_width.

Note that pic_real_width will only be set once the inner function is called and finishes, but that probably will not happened by the time get_real_width exits, so pic_real_width will be undefined when you log and return it.

So, how do you fix this?

That depends on how you're using the result of get_real_width. If, for example, you were creating an alert from the result of get_real_width, like this:

alert(get_real_width(some_img));

Then, you could instead modify your function so that the alert is happening inside function attached to .load:

function alert_real_width(img){
    $("<img/>")
      .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"))
      .load(function() {
         var pic_real_width = this.width;   
         alert( pic_real_width );
       });
}

Obviously, I doubt you're doing an alert, but that should give you an idea of how to approach the problem. For a more general solution, you can use a callback like other users have suggested.

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.load is attaching a load event handler to the image and that event might get fired asynchronously (it could be synchronous if the browser cached the image), wich means the .load call returns right away and the handler will not have been executed yet when you reach return pic_real_width;.

However, you can make use of $.Deferred to solve this issue in an elegant way.

function get_real_width(img){
    var def = $.Deferred();
    $("<img/>")
      .load(function() {
         def.resolve(this.width);
       })
      .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"));
    return def;
}

get_real_width().done(function (width) {
    console.log(width);
});

Please note that I attached the handler before setting the source in case the image was cached and the event gets fired synchronously.

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By default, an ajax() request is asynchronous so the call to ajax() will usually return before the request completes. You could make use of a callback function instead.

function get_real_width(img, callback){
    var pic_real_width;
    $("<img/>") // Make in memory copy of image to avoid css issues
    .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"))
    .load(function() {
        pic_real_width = this.width;   
        callback(pic_real_width ); // Call the function with the number expected
    });
}

 get_real_width(img, function(returnedData){ //anonymous callback function        
    console.log(myVariable);
    return returnedData;
 });

If you absolutely must, you could use async: false inside the call to ajax().

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Returning the promise is just a "little bit" better...

function get_real_width(img, callback) {
    var dfd= $.Deferred(function (dfd) {

        $("<img/>")
            .attr("src", $(img).attr("src"))
            .load(function () {
                dfd.resolve(this.width);
            });
    });

    return dfd.promise();
}
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