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Here is example from one C# book:

//  Timer02.cs - Displaying Date and Time
//      Using the Timer class. 
//      Press Ctrl+C or 'q' folllwed by Enter to end program. 
//------------------------------------------------------------
using System;
using System.Timers;

class myApp
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Timer myTimer = new Timer();
        myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(DisplayTimeEvent);
        myTimer.Interval = 1000;
        myTimer.Start();


        while (Console.Read() != 'q')
        {
            ;    // do nothing...
        }
    }

    public static void DisplayTimeEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.Write("\r{0}", DateTime.Now);
    }
}

I guess that it is supposed that loops runs until q is pressed, but when q is pressed loop is not ending.

What I am missing here?

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1  
followed by Enter to end program. –  Daniel Apr 24 '13 at 16:55
    
You could add enter to end it, or use my example below to use it with just q key. –  Jeffrey Kevin Pry Apr 24 '13 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suspect you didn't press return after q. The Console.Read method blocks until there's an entire line to read, even though it only actually reads a single character of that line.

From the documentation:

The Read method blocks its return while you type input characters; it terminates when you press the Enter key.

share|improve this answer
    
Very simple but true, as I pressed ENTER after q it did what it was supposed to do - terminate loop. Thanks. –  Nenad Bulatovic Apr 24 '13 at 17:03

EDIT: The method I posted never printed the message until some other key was pressed.

This will work however....

public static void Main()
    {
        Timer myTimer = new Timer();
        myTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(DisplayTimeEvent);
        myTimer.Interval = 1000;
        myTimer.Start();

        while (true)
        {
            if (Console.KeyAvailable)
            {
                while (Console.ReadKey().KeyChar != 'q')
                {
                    // do nothing
                }
                break;
            }
        }
    }

The key here is to use: Console.ReadKey().KeyChar != 'q'

share|improve this answer
1  
That's entirely unnecessary, and irrelevant to the question. –  Jon Skeet Apr 24 '13 at 16:56
    
Fixed... Sorry about that. Not really irrelevant though, if the timer was blocking it would never exit. –  Jeffrey Kevin Pry Apr 24 '13 at 16:59
    
Thanks for providing alternative solution. –  Nenad Bulatovic Apr 24 '13 at 17:04
    
What do you mean by "If the timer was blocking"? There's no foreground thread here to stop the process from exiting. –  Jon Skeet Apr 24 '13 at 17:14
    
You're right... My fault :) –  Jeffrey Kevin Pry Apr 24 '13 at 17:15

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