Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am trying to run the following insert statement using pgadmin3:

INSERT INTO device 
VALUES
(12345, 
'asdf',
'OY8YuDFLYdv', 
'2', 
'myname', 
'2013-04-24 11:30:08',
 Null,Null)

But I keep getting the following error message:

ERROR:  invalid input syntax for integer: "asdf"
LINE 4: 'asdf',
        ^


********** Error **********

ERROR: invalid input syntax for integer: "asdf"
SQL state: 22P02
Character: 42

Here's the table definition:

CREATE TABLE device
(
  device_id integer NOT NULL DEFAULT nextval('device_device_id_seq'::regclass),
  userid integer NOT NULL,
  description character varying(255),
  password character varying(255) NOT NULL,
  user_id integer NOT NULL,
  createdname character varying(255),
  createddatetime timestamp without time zone,
  updatedname character varying(255),
  updateddatetime timestamp without time zone,
  CONSTRAINT device_pkey PRIMARY KEY (device_id )
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE device
  OWNER TO appadmin;

Can you tell me where I'm going wrong? I've tried changing the single quotes to double quotes but that didn't help. I don't want to have to list all the column names in the INSERT if I dont have to.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You need to specify the columns to which you are inserting... – bernie Apr 24 '13 at 17:31
    
Example: INSERT INTO device (col1,col2,...) VALUES (...); – bernie Apr 24 '13 at 17:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Apparently you're expecting the INSERT to skip device_id since it is the primary key and has a default that comes from a sequence. That's not going to happen so PostgreSQL thinks you mean this:

insert into device (device_id, userid, ...)
            values (12345,     'asdf', ...);

If you insist on not listing your columns explicitly (and making the people that get to maintain your code suffer needlessly) then you can specify DEFAULT in the VALUES to tell PostgreSQL to use the PK's default value; from the fine manual:

INSERT INTO table_name [ ( column_name [, ...] ) ]
    { DEFAULT VALUES | VALUES ( { expression | DEFAULT } [, ...] ) [, ...] | query }
    [ RETURNING * | output_expression [ [ AS ] output_name ] [, ...] ]

[...] DEFAULT
The corresponding column will be filled with its default value.

For example:

INSERT INTO device 
VALUES
(DEFAULT,
12345, 
'asdf',
...

But really, you should just specify the columns to make the SQL easier to understand and more robust when the schema changes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.