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I would like to overload only one type of subsref calls (the '()' type) for a particular class and leave any other calls to Matlab's built in subsref -- specifically, I want Matlab to handle property/method access via the '.' type. But, it seems like Matlab's 'builtin' function doesn't work when subsref is overloaded in a class.

Consider this class:

classdef TestBuiltIn
    properties
        testprop = 'This is the built in method';
    end

    methods
        function v = subsref(this, s)
            disp('This is the overloaded method');
        end
    end
end

To use the overloaded subsref method, I do this:

t = TestBuiltIn;
t.testprop
    >> This is the overloaded method

That's as expected. But now I want to call Matlab's built in subsref method. To make sure I'm doing things right, first I try out a similar call on a struct:

x.testprop = 'Accessed correctly';
s.type = '.';
s.subs = 'testprop';
builtin('subsref', x, s)
    >> Accessed correctly

That's as expected as well. But, when I try the same method on TestBuiltIn:

builtin('subsref', t, s)
    >> This is the overloaded method

...Matlab calls the overloaded method rather than the built in method. Why does Matlab call the overloaded method when I requested that it call the builtin method?

UPDATE: In response to @Andrew Janke's answer, that solution almost works but doesn't quite. Consider this class:

classdef TestIndexing
    properties
        prop1
        child
    end

    methods
        function this = TestIndexing(n)
            if nargin==0
                n = 1;
            end

            this.prop1 = n;
            if n<2
                this.child = TestIndexing(n+1);
            else
                this.child = ['child on instance ' num2str(n)];
            end
        end

        function v = subsref(this, s)
            if strcmp(s(1).type, '()')
                v = 'overloaded method';
            else
                v = builtin('subsref', this, s);
            end
        end
    end
end

All of this works:

t = TestIndexing;
t(1)
    >> overloaded method
t.prop1
    >> 1
t.child
    >> [TestIndexing instance]
t.child.prop1
    >> 2

But this doesn't work; it uses the built in subsref for the child rather than the overloaded subsref:

t.child(1)
    >> [TestIndexing instance]

Note that the above behavior is inconsistent with both of these behaviors (which are as expected):

tc = t.child;
tc(1)
    >> overloaded method

x.child = t.child;
x.child(1)
    >> overloaded method
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Not sure if I completely understand, but I think that first the builtin function is called, and then in that call the overloading method is called. If possible put a breakpoint in a usefull spot. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Apr 24 '13 at 18:40
    
Something completely different: I hope you just try to do this out of personal interest, as for most problems overloading subsref may not be the nicest solution. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Apr 24 '13 at 18:41
    
I'm not sure what you mean by the builtin function being called first -- if that were hypothetically the case (not sure how, but say), I think I would need to set a breakpoint inside Matlab's built in subsref function to verify. But that's a native function rather than an m function, so I can't put a breakpoint there. –  Ben Apr 24 '13 at 19:26
    
What I really want to do is change the () indexing behavior of my class, just like Matlab's griddedInterpolant class does. But I don't want to have to rewrite the {} and . referencing behaviors from scratch. Unfortunately, this question leads me to believe that it is impossible to change one behavior without re-implementing the other behaviors from scratch as well. –  Ben Apr 24 '13 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's possible, IIRC. To change () but not {} and '.', write your subsref method to pass those other cases along to the builtin subsref from within your overloaded subsref, instead of trying to explicitly call the builtin from outside.

function B = subsref(A, S)
    % Handle the first indexing on your obj itself
    switch S(1).type
        case '()'
            B = % ... do your custom "()" behavior ...
        otherwise
            % Enable normal "." and "{}" behavior
            B = builtin('subsref', A, S(1))
        end
    end
    % Handle "chaining" (not sure this part is fully correct; it is tricky)
    orig_B = B; % hold on to a copy for debugging purposes
    if numel(S) > 1
        B = subsref(B, S(2:end)); % regular call, not "builtin", to support overrides
    end
end

(And if that builtin call doesn't work, you can just put in cases that use . and {} directly, because the subsref overload is ignored inside the class definition.)

To make it fully functional, you may need to change B to a varargout, and add chaining behavior in to the "()" case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this almost works but not quite -- please see the update in my question –  Ben Apr 24 '13 at 21:43
    
What's going on there is that in Matlab, an expression with multiple indexing like foo.bar.baz(3), instead of being evaluated in steps like doing foo.bar and then passing the result to .baz and then passing that result to (3), will parse up the entire expression and pass it in a single call to subsref. (This is nonintuitive.) So your subsref needs to look at S, handle S(1), and then handle "chaining" behavior by manually passing the results along with S(2:end) along to another call of subsref, which will then pick up the overloaded method. –  Andrew Janke Apr 25 '13 at 0:01
    
I've modified my example code to show "chaining" behavior. It's a bit tricky and I can't test it for correctness because I don't have Matlab right now (sorry), but this is basically what you need to do. –  Andrew Janke Apr 25 '13 at 0:05
    
(Note that the important part is that the chained subsref call is a regular subsref() call, not via builtin. Doing the entire thing with a single builtin call will ignore (some of) the overriden methods on intermediate expression results, which looks like what you got in your "update" examples.) –  Andrew Janke Apr 25 '13 at 0:07
    
P.S. Be patient; working with subsref, subsasgn, and their friends really is difficult, and a lot of work to get fully correct. Experiment, and give the documentation a good thorough reread or two. –  Andrew Janke Apr 25 '13 at 0:10

To expand on the explanation given on the Mathworks board, builtin only works from within an overloaded method to access the pre-existing (built in) method.

Overloading a method in Matlab effectively shadows the built in implementation from everything except the method doing the shadowing, and the method doing the shadowing must use builtin to access the built in implementation instead of recursing into itself.

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In general. You should use builtin(m,s) inside the function that is been overloaded. This is specified clearly in MATLAB documentation.

http://www.mathworks.com/help/matlab/ref/builtin.html

builtin(function,x1,...,xn) executes the built-in function with the input arguments x1 through xn. Use builtin to execute the original built-in from within a method that overloads the function. To work properly, you must never overload builtin.

Consider this code:

classdef TestBuiltIn
    properties
        testprop = 'This is the built in method';
        testprop2 = 'This is the derived subsref ';
    end
    methods

        function v = subsref(m, s)
            disp('enter subsref no matter how!');
            v = builtin('subsref',m, s);
        end
    end
end

and test command

clear;
t = TestBuiltIn;
builtin('subsref', t, s)
s.type = '.';
s.subs = 'testprop';
s2 = s;
s2.subs = 'testprop2';

>> builtin('subsref', t, s1)

enter subsref no matter how!

ans =

This is the derived subsref 

>> builtin('subsref', t, s)
enter subsref no matter how!

ans =

This is the built in method
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