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public class Userr extends Model{
    @Id
    public Long id;
    @OneToMany
    List<Badge> badges;
}

public class Badge extends Model{
    @Id
    public Long id;
    @ManyToOne
    Userr user;
}

those are my 2 models and this is the error generated :

[RuntimeException: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Query threw SQLException:Column "T1.USERR_ID" not found; SQL statement: select t0.id c0 , t1.id_ c1, t1.name_ c2, t1.desc_ c3, t1.img_url_ c4, t1.effect_ c5, t1.user_id c6 from userr t0 left outer join badge t1 on t1.userr_id = t0.id where t0.id = ? order by t0.id [42122-168] Bind values:[null] Query was: select t0.id c0 , t1.id_ c1, t1.name_ c2, t1.desc_ c3, t1.img_url_ c4, t1.effect_ c5, t1.user_id c6 from userr t0 left outer join badge t1 on t1.userr_id = t0.id where t0.id = ? order by t0.id (through reference chain: com.avaje.ebean.common.BeanList[0]->models.Userr["created_badges"])]

I wonder why did it translate the findAll query using userr_id instead of user_id while nothing that in my model file, the field is called user_id.

I tried changing user to userr and it worked because it translated it into <classname>_id

Is this a bug ? or Am I use it wrong ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is not a BUG! It is the default behavior for DDL generation pattern. I will explain you with the possible cases that commonly occurred:

1st case: You have not creating table before on the database

When you first build the application without using existing table, I think the problem that you faced before will not occurred (As long as you use default configuration value and set the application into DEV mode). Straight to the point, let say you have 2 model like you had before:

@Entity
public class Userr extends Model {
    @Id
    public Long id;
    public String realName;
    @OneToMany
    List<Badge> badges;
}

@Entity
public class Badge extends Model {
    @Id
    public Long id;
    @ManyToOne
    Userr user;
}

At the moment when you run your application, simplicity the framework should tell DDL generation pattern to look at your connected database and find whether there is a table named userr and badge. Because you have not created these table before, so the framework will be generating these two table automatically on your database. Based on your model, the framework will generate your table using the script similar to (PostgreSQL script) :

-- the java class name is 'Userr' generated as 'userr'
CREATE TABLE userr {
    -- long on java generated as bigint
    id        bigint,
    -- 'realName' on java generated as 'realname' and string on java generated as varchar whose length 255 
    realname  character varying(255),
    -- one to many 'badges' field is not generated
    CONSTRAINT pk_userr PRIMARY KEY (id), -- id as primary key
}
-- the java class name is 'Badge' generated as 'badge'
CREATE TABLE badge {
    id        bigint,
    -- 'Userr' Object with MayToOne relation generated as the foreign key to the id on 'userr' table
    userr_id  bigint,
    CONSTRAINT pk_badge PRIMARY KEY (id),                      
    CONSTRAINT fk_badge_userr FOREIGN KEY (userr_id)
       REFERENCES userr (id) MATCH SIMPLE
       ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE NO ACTION,

}

2nd case: You have existing table on database

Assume you have previously 2 table with name user_account and badge. The user_account table look like these :

CREATE TABLE user_account {
    id        bigint,
    real_name character varying(100),
    CONSTRAINT pk_userr PRIMARY KEY (id),
}
CREATE TABLE badge {
    id        bigint,
    user_id   bigint,
    CONSTRAINT pk_badge PRIMARY KEY (id),                      
    CONSTRAINT fk_badge_user_account FOREIGN KEY (user_id)
       REFERENCES user_account (id) MATCH SIMPLE
       ON UPDATE NO ACTION ON DELETE NO ACTION,
}

You can correctly use your previous model (with some modification) to work with your current table by use the code like following:

@javax.persistence.Entity
// define this model as table named 'user_account'
@javax.persistence.Table(name = "user_account")
public class Userr extends Model {
    @Id
    public Long id;
    // define this field as column named 'real_name' whose length is 100
    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "real_name", length = 100)
    public String realName;
    @OneToMany
    List<Badge> badges;
}

@javax.persistence.Entity
public class Badge extends Model {
    @Id
    public Long id;
    @ManyToOne
    // define this field as column named 'user_id' and 
    // this act as reference to model 'Userr' using field named 'id' on it
    @javax.persistence.JoinColumn(name = "user_id", referencedColumnName = "id")
    Userr user;
}

Hope this can help you understand better with the DDL generation pattern.. :)

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