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I would like to give a variable from PHP to bash without using the standard output. My problem can be reduced to the following one:

How to make this code work?

export A=1;
php -r "echo 'variable A equals: '.\$_SERVER['A'].\"\n\";"
php -r "\$_SERVER['A']=0;"
echo $A

EDIT:

The following code does not work:

export A=1;
php -r "echo 'variable A equals: '.\$_SERVER['A'].\"\n\";"
php -r "putenv(\"A=0\");"
// Same problem with:
// php -r "exec(\"export A=0\");"
echo $A
share|improve this question
    
use putenv("A=0"); – bwoebi Apr 24 '13 at 17:35
    
See my updated comment. Either run the bash script as a child process or return values directly to a shell variable by spawning the php processes as a child on the command line. – tristan Apr 24 '13 at 17:52
    
Spawning the php process as a child would mean use the standard input to get the variable, am I wrong? – sdenel Apr 24 '13 at 17:56
    
No, as long as you send the return to a shell variable, you can use it inline like any other subroutine. ( e.g. like saying myUser=$(whoami) ) – tristan Apr 24 '13 at 18:59
    
Dear tristan, your solution works, but does not answer the problem as stated. I want to use the stdout for other purposes during my script, therefore I can't just put in a variable the output of the script. May you give me a solution that does not use the standard output, then I would be glad to accept it. – sdenel Apr 25 '13 at 17:58

You want to look into using putenv. http://php.net/manual/en/function.putenv.php

If you're running this in a different scope (e.g. letting the PHP script die, then running the BASH script), try the following to assign myvar as the output of your file:

$ myvar=$(php -f example.php)  
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This does not work. Read the documentation: The environment variable will only exist for the duration of the current request. At the end of the request the environment is restored to its original state. – Tim Cooper Apr 24 '13 at 17:39
1  
@TimCooper he did not specify that he was running the bash script outside of the scope of PHP (such as, letting the PHP script die, then running the bash script). – tristan Apr 24 '13 at 17:41
putenv("A=0");

that should work as expected :)

share|improve this answer
    
No, it shouldn't. Read the documentation: The environment variable will only exist for the duration of the current request. At the end of the request the environment is restored to its original state. – Tim Cooper Apr 24 '13 at 17:41

how about this? exec("export A=".$_SERVER['A'].)

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I just tried and it does not work either. – sdenel Apr 24 '13 at 17:40

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