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I'm working with the USDA nutrition database, whose foods have the following description:

For example:

Cheese, fontina
Cheese, cheddar
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 2% milkfat
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 1% milkfat
Apples, raw, with skin
Apples, dried, sulfured, uncooked
Apples, frozen, unsweetened, heated
McDONALD'S, BIG MAC (without Big Mac Sauce)
McDONALD'S, BIG MAC
Sandwiches and burgers, roast beef sandwich with cheese

There's a pattern here, the commas are clearly used to separate entities. Following the example above, cheese is a parent of cheddar, cottage and fontina.

I've already done some work in order to extract information from this source. I thought that with:

  • POS tagging: if a word is an adjective or a verb, is not part of the food's name
  • freqdist/wordcount: this was done in order to obtain a hierarchy of words in a food's description

But I get unnacurate results when I run it in large scale. The POS tagging failed in some descriptions and the freqdist/wordcount wasn't useful when in a same sentence there were word with similar frecuency.

This is an example of the result I would like to get:

input data:

Cheese, fontina
Cheese, cheddar
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 2% milkfat
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 1% milkfat

output data:

Cheese is the parent of fontina, cottage and cheddar. lowfat is a "characteristic" cheese cottage. Cottage, cheddar and fontina are the "principal foods".

input data:

Sandwiches and burgers, roast beef sandwich with cheese

output data:

Cheese is a characteristic of roast beef sandwich. The category of the food is    sandwiches and burgers and the "principal food" is roast beef sandwich. 

I'm a beginner so I'd like to get some guidance about it. There is a lot of information on NLP and it's hard to determine which path to take without having a wide knowledge in the subject.

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1 Answer 1

It's not really a NLP question...

The data is a tree. Think of each line as a partial path in a tree graph. The words after second comma seem to be values of a leaf.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Jesse Apr 27 '13 at 0:13
    
What I'm saying is I don't believe NLP can provide an answer to such a question. Perhaps it would be better to tag it as a data-mining question. –  abecadel Apr 27 '13 at 0:19
    
Right, it's still a comment though, not an answer. If you expand it enough to be an actual answer, even if it's telling the asker that it is not an NLP question, while providing an answer regarding the data tree. –  Jesse Apr 27 '13 at 0:20

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