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Using a query like below you can fetch rows in which the color of the id is blue, purple, green, white, and black.

SELECT t1.id, col
FROM extra as e INNER JOIN your_table as t1 USING ( id )
CROSS JOIN your_table as t2 USING ( id )
CROSS JOIN your_table as t3 USING ( id )
CROSS JOIN your_table as t4 USING ( id )
CROSS JOIN your_table as t5 USING ( id )
WHERE t1.color = 'blue' and t2.color = 'purple' and t3.color= 'green' and t4.color= 'white' and t5.color= 'black'

If you try to use != or NOT IN, it doesn't seem to work. How would I write the query so that the colors would contain blue, purple, green, white, but NOT black?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do something along the lines of:

select e.id
from   extra as e
where  exists (select null from your_table as t where t.id = e.id and t.color = 'blue')
  and  exists (select null from your_table as t where t.id = e.id and t.color = 'purple')
  and  exists (select null from your_table as t where t.id = e.id and t.color = 'green')
  and  exists (select null from your_table as t where t.id = e.id and t.color = 'white')
  and not exists (select null from your_table as t where t.id = e.id and t.color = 'black')

Or, something like this would probably be more efficient:

select e.id
from   extra as e
where  4 = 
       (select count(*) 
        from   your_table as t 
        where  t.id = e.id 
          and  t.color in ('blue', 'purple', 'green', 'white'))
  and  0 = 
       (select count(*) 
        from   your_table as t 
        where  t.id = e.id 
          and  t.color in ('black'))
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1  
Yep, this works, but surprisingly the first one was actually more efficient. It was about 2-3 times faster than the second queries. However, my original cross join is about twice as fast as the first one. Is this the cost of selecting something that doesn't exist in addition? –  Roger Oct 25 '09 at 3:50
    
You might try adding an index to your_table on (id, color) if you don't have one. –  James McNellis Oct 25 '09 at 3:55
    
Ah yep, figured that would be the problem. The id was indexed, but not the second column. It's much faster now. Both queries seem to be about the same speed, but the first 2nd one has less "dependent subqueries" so I assume that's better. –  Roger Oct 25 '09 at 4:07

I don't know why you're using CROSS JOIN. That's usually for generating Cartesian products. All you need is a plain INNER JOIN or simply JOIN.

I usually use an OUTER JOIN when I want to test for the absence of some data. When no match is found, t5 will be NULL.

SELECT t1.id, col
FROM extra as e 
INNER JOIN your_table as t1 ON ( e.id=t1.id AND t1.color = 'blue' )
INNER JOIN your_table as t2 ON ( e.id=t2.id AND t2.color = 'purple' )
INNER JOIN your_table as t3 ON ( e.id=t3.id AND t3.color = 'green' )
INNER JOIN your_table as t4 ON ( e.id=t4.id AND t4.color = 'white' )
LEFT OUTER JOIN your_table as t5 ON ( e.id=t5.id AND t5.color = 'black' )
WHERE t5.id IS NULL;

You're right that the above technique using joins is faster than using correlated subqueries, and it's also (at least in MySQL) faster than a GROUP BY solution that some people use:

SELECT e.id, col
FROM extra as e
INNER JOIN your_table AS t USING ( id)
WHERE t.color IN ('blue', 'purple', 'green', 'white')
GROUP BY e.id
HAVING COUNT(*) = 4;

(This query doesn't solve the "not black" problem, I'm just illustrating the technique.)

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cross join and inner join are synonyms in MySQL (but not in ANSI SQL). +1 for the good idea with the left outer join. –  James McNellis Oct 25 '09 at 4:14
    
Cool, thanks for enlightening and sharing another method that works. –  Roger Oct 25 '09 at 4:15

I think you are overcomplicating the query, what you are attempting appears to be a standard join like so

select * from cars join colors where cars.colorid = colors.colorid where colors.color != 'black'
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I'm assuming the second where is an AND? But yea that doesn't work. –  Roger Oct 25 '09 at 3:50

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