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The generic goal

Say we have a "small" 10x10 grid with some fixed nodes @ placed at random positions

. . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . . 
. . . @ . . . . . . 
. . . @ . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . @ . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . @ . . 
. . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . . 

And say we have ~30 nodes whose value is a function of what nodes it's adjacent to (with adjacency being defined as any of the 8 points surrounding a spot). That is to say, if we consider nodes A and B placed on the map

. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 
. . A @ . . B . . .     . . A @ . . . . . . 
. . . @ . . . . . .     . B . @ . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . @ . . . .     . . . . . @ . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . @ . .     . . . . . . . @ . . 
. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 
. . . . . . . . . .     . . . . . . . . . . 

the output of both A and B may be different in these two maps because A and B are adjacent in the second but not in the first.

Our goal is to place all the nodes on the map in such a way that the sum of all nodes is maximal (or at least pretty good.)

Additional constraints for my particular problem

  1. There are about 8 'classes' of nodes. All nodes in each class behave the same, so this can be used to reduce the search space.
  2. Certain nodes dominate the overall value, so knowing this allows me to optimize around these core nodes.
  3. Each node usually only has two or three other classes of nodes that increase it's value when it's adjacent to a node of those classes.
  4. All values are ≥ 0.
  5. I'd like to find good fits in a matter of seconds.. so there's some room for computation, but a pretty good solution in 5 seconds is better than a perfect solution in 2 days.

Naive greedy approach

What I'm doing right now is taking a simple greedy approach, then fine tuning the result.

I look at all the places on the grid and consider it for all the nodes that I haven't placed yet, and pick the best placement that I find. If there are multiple "best" positions, I pick one at random. I do this until all nodes have been placed.

After this initial process, I then pick a node at random and try and find a better place for it by looking at all open spots. I consider the effect that moving the node has on the node itself, as well as it's adjacent neighbors, so I don't move it if it's already in the best place overall. I do this a few thousand times to "fine tune" my layout.

Because of the random factors, I can get very different outputs given the same inputs, so I perform this process several times and take the best result.

The question

How can I do better than this naive greedy approach?

I feel like there should be a much better solution that takes into account a priori adjacency information, but it is eluding me. Any thoughts, links, or tips would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
It might be worth it to determine the optimal placement on a few smaller random grids using fewer nodes (i.e. something tractable) - this might help to suggest a heuristic you can apply to the full problem. – Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Apr 24 '13 at 18:20
    
So my fear with optimizing smaller grids is that I'll start finding local optimums and get kinda stuck there. Is that a valid concern do you think? – hexist Apr 24 '13 at 19:30
1  
This is a valid concern - the idea is to use something like an exhaustive backtracking search on the smaller grid so that you're guaranteed to find the global optimum. With any luck an obvious pattern will emerge as to what the optimum looks like. – Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Apr 24 '13 at 19:34
    
By "sum of all nodes is maximal", what exactly determines their value, it doesn't sound like it just the number of adjacent nodes? Is it completely node dependent, or is their some underlying value directly based on position in the grid (and not their adjacency)? Are the fixed nodes the same? – SGM1 Apr 24 '13 at 19:49
    
@SGM1 In my particular problem, each node has a base value, and then depending on what it's adjacent to, we add to that value.. so it's a function of it's neighbors plus a constant. The position in the grid doesn't affect the value in my case. In my case there are two types of fixed nodes. – hexist Apr 24 '13 at 20:07

I've worked on an algorithm for something similar-ish recently.

The idea :

We want to restrict our options in order to gain computation time (that was my problem cause i've done it in 3D)

It seems logical in your case that you want to place nodes next to already placed nodes. Let's mark p the possibilities.

. p . . . . .
p @ p p . . .
. p p @ p . .
. p @ p . . .
. p p . . . .
p @ @ p . p .
p p p . p @ p

Initialization:

Let's call "Cluster" an array which contains possible places. Here it's the array with all p

For each node that you need to place you find the best option among those p; So for each new node you got something like Node::(place & value)

Iteration:

You place the best node , that will remove 1 possibility in the Cluster and add some (depending on already surrounding nodes)

Now you want to update the best place & value for each node. But you can work on the few modified nodes because every other possibility is already computed :

. p . . . . .  A : recently placed
p @ p p . . .  C : new possibilities / possible changes
. p p @ p . .
. p @ p . . .
. C A C . . .
p @ @ p . p .
p p p . p @ p

Here for example only 2 computations are necessary for each node left. If the new value is greater => change the (value & position)

Iterate.

Possibilities of errors:

I can't tell if this will work perfectly with your problem because i got no way to know if a "bigger" value need to be placed first or not but i guess so.

This solution will not be the perfect one but should be a correct one if your values are linear or almost linear in the number of surrounding pores.

I can't find a way to say that in english but in french i call this kind of algorithm "Algorithme de progression de front" which is something like "Front-Progress Algorithm". Maybe can you find something based on that but i didnt after a quick search.

I hope that it helped you.

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