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Lets say I have some sealed classes

sealed abstract class SomeEnumThing {
    type RenderedType
}
object Type1 extends SomeEnumThing {
    type RenderedType = String
}
object Type2 extends SomeEnumThing  {
     type RenderedType = Array[Byte]
}

And I want a method to return based on the abstract type defined in the parameter passed in, eg

def render(something : SomeEnumThing) : something.RenderedType = { .... }

What is the correct syntax for this. Is this even possible, I thought it would have something to do with 2.10 method dependent types.

Edit: Updated Example

sealed abstract class SomeThing {
    type RenderedType
}
object Type1 extends SomeThing {
    type RenderedType = String
}
object Type2 extends SomeThing  {
     type RenderedType = Long
}

def render(something : SomeThing) : something.RenderedType = 
  something match {
    case Type1 => "test"
    case Type2 => 0l
}
share|improve this question
2  
Your problem is that you want case matching to introduce new type knowledge and it doesn't in your case. With GADTs and dependent types, this can happen easily, but it doesn't happen in your situation. Luckily, Scala supports some fairly neutered notion of a GADT and your type is isomorphic to one, so you can change your SomeThing to SomeThing[A] and have Type1 extends SomeThing[String] and Type2 extends SomeThing[Long]. Then with render[A](something: SomeThing[A]): A your case block will just work. –  Mysterious Dan Apr 24 '13 at 21:55
    
So to paraphrase you're saying the compiler doesn't determine that the only possible return from Type1 is a String, which happens to be the value of the RenderedType for that case. It could if it was clever enough, but the Scala compiler isn't there yet. –  monkjack Apr 24 '13 at 22:05
2  
Yeah, it's one of those more "dependent" things to want to do. Case matching in my example works, but I'm not too convinced about its implementation (if you refine two type variables to be equal, for example, it doesn't work right, or if you have variance annotations on your refined type variables). If you really want to start doing things like this, you'll probably need to turn your code inside-out and define consumption/eliminator functions on SomeThing. –  Mysterious Dan Apr 24 '13 at 22:09
    
Thanks for the comprehensive comments :) –  monkjack Apr 24 '13 at 22:22

1 Answer 1

Structurally, what you have in your example seems to be correct, but the question is what will you be doing inside of those elipses to return that something.RenderedType. I threw a quick impl together to check that everything compiles (and it does), but like I said, it boils down to what's going on inside of that render function. Here's my code:

object RenderedTypeTest {

  def render(something : SomeEnumThing) : something.RenderedType = {
    something.renderType
  }
}

sealed abstract class SomeEnumThing {
    type RenderedType
    def renderType:RenderedType
}
object Type1 extends SomeEnumThing {
    type RenderedType = String
    def renderType = "hello"
}
object Type2 extends SomeEnumThing  {
     type RenderedType = Array[Byte]
     def renderType = Array()
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's actually an Option of something. It wasn't working when I had the real code setup and I was sure I was correct in the implementing method, but I'll have another play and report back. –  monkjack Apr 24 '13 at 19:34
    
I've added an updated example that doesn't compile for me - maybe I am doing something stupid. Actually that's very very likely. –  monkjack Apr 24 '13 at 19:58
    
I'll give your new code a shot tonight. In transit right now. –  cmbaxter Apr 24 '13 at 20:14

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