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I have a list of lists DataCoord:

[nodeID, X, Y, Z]

with multiple rows. Some nodes will have the same X and Y coordinates and different Z coordinate. For example, say I have:

Pair (X,Y) = (0,0):
[1, 0, 0, 0,]: level 0
[m, 0, 0, 200]: level m
[n, 0, 0, 100]: level n #the DataCoord list may not be ordered

I'd like to identify and sort the different zlevels for this (x,y) pair.
And the same for other parts which share the same X and Y coordinates.

Any help is appreciated.

EDIT: as an example of DataCoord:

[['173', '0.', '0.', '0.'], ['183', '1000.', '0.', '0.'], ['184', '0.', '1000.', '0.'], ['194', '1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['195', '0.', '0.', '1000.'], ['205', '1000.', '0.', '1000.'], ['206', '0.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['216', '1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['217', '0.', '0.', '2000.'], ['227', '1000.', '0.', '2000.'], ['228', '0.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['238', '1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['239', '0.', '0.', '3000.'], ['249', '1000.', '0.', '3000.'], ['250', '0.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['260', '1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['261', '0.', '0.', '4000.'], ['271', '1000.', '0.', '4000.'], ['272', '0.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['282', '1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['283', '0.', '0.', '0.'], ['293', '0.', '1000.', '0.'], ['294', '1000.', '0.', '0.'], ['304', '1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['305', '0.', '0.', '1000.'], ['315', '0.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['316', '1000.', '0.', '1000.'], ['326', '1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['327', '0.', '0.', '2000.'], ['337', '0.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['338', '1000.', '0.', '2000.'], ['348', '1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['349', '0.', '0.', '3000.'], ['359', '0.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['360', '1000.', '0.', '3000.'], ['370', '1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['371', '0.', '0.', '4000.'], ['381', '0.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['382', '1000.', '0.', '4000.'], ['392', '1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['436', '-1000.', '0.', '0.'], ['446', '0.', '0.', '0.'], ['447', '-1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['457', '0.', '1000.', '0.'], ['458', '-1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['468', '0.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['469', '-1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['479', '0.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['480', '-1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['490', '0.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['491', '-1000.', '0.', '0.'], ['501', '-1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['502', '-1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['512', '0.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['513', '-1000.', '0.', '1000.'], ['523', '0.', '0.', '1000.'], ['524', '-1000.', '0.', '2000.'], ['534', '0.', '0.', '2000.'], ['535', '-1000.', '0.', '3000.'], ['545', '0.', '0.', '3000.'], ['546', '-1000.', '0.', '4000.'], ['556', '0.', '0.', '4000.'], ['557', '-1000.', '0.', '1000.'], ['567', '-1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['568', '-1000.', '0.', '3000.'], ['578', '-1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['579', '-1000.', '0.', '2000.'], ['589', '-1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['590', '-1000.', '0.', '4000.'], ['600', '-1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['687', '0.', '2000.', '0.'], ['697', '1000.', '2000.', '0.'], ['698', '0.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['708', '1000.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['709', '0.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['719', '1000.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['720', '0.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['730', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['731', '0.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['741', '1000.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['742', '0.', '1000.', '0.'], ['752', '0.', '2000.', '0.'], ['753', '1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['763', '1000.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['764', '1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['774', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['775', '1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['785', '1000.', '2000.', '0.'], ['786', '1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['796', '1000.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['797', '1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['807', '1000.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['808', '-1000.', '1000.', '0.'], ['818', '-1000.', '2000.', '0.'], ['819', '0.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['829', '0.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['830', '0.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['840', '0.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['841', '0.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['851', '0.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['852', '0.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['862', '0.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['863', '-1000.', '2000.', '0.'], ['873', '0.', '2000.', '0.'], ['874', '-1000.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['884', '0.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['885', '-1000.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['895', '0.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['896', '-1000.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['906', '0.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['907', '-1000.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['917', '0.', '2000.', '4000.'], ['918', '-1000.', '1000.', '1000.'], ['928', '-1000.', '2000.', '1000.'], ['929', '-1000.', '1000.', '3000.'], ['939', '-1000.', '2000.', '3000.'], ['940', '-1000.', '1000.', '2000.'], ['950', '-1000.', '2000.', '2000.'], ['951', '-1000.', '1000.', '4000.'], ['961', '-1000.', '2000.', '4000.']]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Loop over your values and collect the Z coordinates per X, Y pair; using collections.defaultdict makes this a little easier, setting the default to an empty set for each key:

from collections import defaultdict

levels = defaultdict(set)

for node_id, x, y, z in list_of_datacoords:
    levels[x, y].add(z)

Now levels is a dictionary mapping x, y coordinates to a set of unique z values.

For your example input, that results in:

>>> pprint(dict(levels))
{('-1000.', '0.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('-1000.', '1000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('-1000.', '2000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('0.', '0.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('0.', '1000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('0.', '2000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('1000.', '0.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('1000.', '1000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.']),
 ('1000.', '2000.'): set(['0.', '1000.', '2000.', '3000.', '4000.'])}

You can now get a sorted list of levels per x, y pair:

for (x, y), z in levels.iteritems():
    z = sorted(z)
    # now you have x, y and a sorted list of `z` values.

The pprint() call above already printed the sets in sorted order; that is because pprint() sorts the output of python sequences by default.

share|improve this answer
    
Martijn However, the z levels will change with different pairs of x,y.... will this work in that case? –  jpcgandre Apr 24 '13 at 20:34
1  
@jpcgandre: This code collects z levels per (x, y) pair. It doesn't matter that different pairs have different z levels, because that is already handled. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 24 '13 at 20:35
    
OK, thanks for your help! –  jpcgandre Apr 24 '13 at 20:37
1  
@jpcgandre: This code creates a set for each pair of (x, y) so additional z levels are handled automatically. Only unique values for z are retained. You could replace set with list to get all z level values, duplicates and all. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 24 '13 at 21:02
1  
@jpcgandre: Replace .add() (a set method) with .append() (a list method). –  Martijn Pieters Apr 24 '13 at 21:11

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