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I've seen people doing this from wherever in their code:

$rootScope.$broadcast('someEvent', someParameter); 

and then in some controller:

$rootScope.$on('someEvent', function(event, e){ /* implementation here */ });

Now, I'd like to broacast an event from a directive. Is it good practice to broadcast it at rootScope level ? I would like to handle this event in a controller. Can I use $scope, or do I still have to listen on $rootScope ?

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do you have isolated scope in directive of using parent scope of controller –  Ajay Beniwal Apr 24 '13 at 18:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

In my case, I just want to broadcast an even from a directive to the controller of the view, in which I use the directive. Does it still make sense to use broadcast then?

I would have the directive call a method on the controller, which is specified in the HTML where the directive is used:

For a directive that uses an isolate scope:

<div my-dir ctrl-fn="someCtrlFn(arg1)"></div>

app.directive('myDir', function() {
  return {
    scope: { ctrlFn: '&' },
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
       ...
       scope.ctrlFn({arg1: someValue});
    }

For a directive that does not use an isolate scope:

<div my-dir ctrl-fn="someCtrlFn(arg1)"></div>

app.directive('myDir', function($parse) {
  return {
    scope: true,  // or no new scope -- i.e., remove this line
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
       var invoker = $parse(attrs.ctrlFn);
       ...
       invoker(scope, {arg1: someValue} );
    }
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actually, I'm doing that already. But I wanted to use event broadcasting as I thought it'd be better practice. Is it not in this case ? $emit and $on sound good :) –  Sam Apr 24 '13 at 19:35
    
@Sam, I don't know which is better practice. An event results in more coupling between your directive and your controller because your controller has to listen for a specific event that your directive will emit. I prefer using a method because it is more explicit/declarative that the directive will be communicating with the controller, and I can declare in my HTML how that happens. –  Mark Rajcok Apr 24 '13 at 19:43
    
ok, thanks for your advice ! –  Sam Apr 24 '13 at 19:48
7  
@MarkRajcok I wouldn't say an event results in coupling. An event amounts more to a pub/sub architecture, which is a loosely coupled scenario. In other words, the event handler wouldn't be called if the event is never triggered, but it's not going to cause an error. Likewise with the '&' controller method, if it's not called, it's not called. I'd say the only advantage to the '&' method over the event is it doesn't "consume" an event name (which probably isn't a big deal). –  Ben Lesh Jul 30 '13 at 12:56
1  
Thanks @blesh. "Coupling" was a poor word choice on my part. Either the controller needs to know an event name, or the controller needs to know an attribute name (for specifying a callback function), so the advantage I mentioned doesn't really exist. –  Mark Rajcok Jul 30 '13 at 19:37
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It's usually a good idea not to use the $rootScope as it's global and you shouldn't pollute it unless you really know what you're doing. I would recommend that you read this article about communication between services, directives and controllers.

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1  
according to the article: "Whenever you have an event take place in your application which affects all controllers and directives". In my case, I just want to broadcast an even from a directive to the controller of the view, in which I use the directive. Does it still make sense to use broadcast then ? –  Sam Apr 24 '13 at 18:58
1  
no you should not be broadcasting ,broadcasting is meant to send events from parent scope to all child scopes and u are doing other way around –  Ajay Beniwal Apr 24 '13 at 19:00
3  
Yes, if you want to listen to events from a parent controller you should do $scope.$emit in the directive and $scope.$on in the parent controller –  joakimbl Apr 24 '13 at 19:06
    
Useful link, thanks. –  aidan Nov 11 '13 at 5:18
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