Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have to display the following figure (The two triangles intercept) for a n given by the user, where n is odd. The figure is in this link: http://i.imgur.com/mQxarLz.jpg

*******
 *****
  ***
   *
   *
  ***
 *****
*******

I already wrote this code, but I don't know how to give the n, where n is odd. And my code doesn't compile; it says: "In the fifth row, syntax error before for".

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    int n,i,k,m;

    for(m=0;m<2;m++)
        for  (i=1;i<=n;i++){ 
            if(m==0){    
                for(k = 1; k<=n-i; k++){        
                    printf("  ");      
                }   
            } 
        }
    for (k=1;k<2*i;k++){   
        printf("%s","*");   
        //printf("%d",i);
    }

    scanf("%d",&n);

    for (k = 1; k<=i;k++)
        for (k=1;k<(n-i)*2;k++)
           for (i=1;i<=n;i++) {   
               printf("\n$"); 
           }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Assuming you have proper indent in your actual program. You are missing an opening bracket after int main() and a closing bracket at the end. – Floris Velleman Apr 24 '13 at 18:29
1  
This code has so many problems. Like main() is not being followed by {} and the for loop in 5th line is also missing {}. – Sukrit Kalra Apr 24 '13 at 18:30
2  
@SukritKalra It's valid to not have {} after a for, it will just use the next statement as the loop body (which here is the two for loops following it). Whether that is intentional or not is a different question. – ajp15243 Apr 24 '13 at 18:32
2  
@JonathanLeffler Thanks , Jonathan. I can remove the bandages from my eyes now. – WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 18:35
2  
Honestly, sir, just by looking at this code, determining whether N is odd is the least of your worries. – WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 18:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>

void printAsterisk(int n, int length){
    int i, slen = (length - n)/2;
    for(i=0;i < slen;++i)
        putchar(' ');
    for(i=0;i < n;++i)
        putchar('*');
    putchar('\n');
}
/* non-recursive
void printTriangle(int n, int length){//n isn't required as an argument
    int d= -2;
    for(; n < length + 1; n += d){
        if(n < 0) n += (d *= -1);
        printAsterisk(n, length);
    }
}
*/    
void printTriangle(int n, int length){
    if(n < 1) return;
    printAsterisk(n, length);
    printTriangle(n - 2, length);
    printAsterisk(n, length);
}

int main(void){
    int n;
    do{
        printf("input odd number:");
        scanf("%d", &n);
    }while(n % 2 == 0);

    printTriangle(n, n);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You sir,are a f***** genius.Thank you. – Sdasd Sdaf Apr 24 '13 at 18:58
5  
I don't think a lot has been learned today. – Floris Velleman Apr 24 '13 at 18:59
1  
It'd say each person. – BLUEPIXY Apr 24 '13 at 19:02
    
I understood the logic,Floris.I learned it.Interesting fact : This is not a homework. – Sdasd Sdaf Apr 24 '13 at 19:04
    
@SdasdSdaf It may be good to try the loop as the first policy. – BLUEPIXY Apr 24 '13 at 19:05

First, the answer to "how do I check whether an integer is odd": you simply divide by 2 and check if the remainder is 0 (even) or 1 (odd). In C and most related languages, this is what the modulo operator "%" does:

if ((n % 2) == 1) {
    // The number is odd.
}

But you should make sure that you read your n right at the start, because in the code that you have submitted, n is read in your second "for" loop before you have actually written something to it. And that means, n contains garbage at that point.

share|improve this answer
    
Pasting this in still leave's you with a mess though. – Floris Velleman Apr 24 '13 at 18:43
    
I know right :/ :/ – Sdasd Sdaf Apr 24 '13 at 18:43
    
No problem. BTW, your compiler error might be because there's a { missing after "main" (but then, it does look like that's not the whole code? it's also missing return and main's }. – DarkDust Apr 24 '13 at 18:44
2  
Obviously it has many logical errors and its not going to work.I will quit this thing and go work at Starbucks. – Sdasd Sdaf Apr 24 '13 at 18:45
    
Yeah, you better start completely over with this one. Try to solve this in steps. Like, first solve the problem of how to print a single line with hardcoded values (for example, assume n=5 and you're printing the second line). Then you move on to solve this hole shape with hardcoded values, and then you read it via scanf. – DarkDust Apr 24 '13 at 18:50

Good programming is to solve problems in the most simple way you can find. This particular algorithm is really fundamental stuff, thus you shouldn't end up with anything much more complicated than this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

void print_chars (char symbol, int n)
{
  for(int i=0; i<n; i++)
  {
    printf("%c", symbol);
  }
}

void print_triangle (int base_size, int height, bool pointing_up)
{
  int star_count = pointing_up ? 1 : base_size;

  for(int row = 0; row < height; row++)
  {
    int spaces = base_size - star_count;

    print_chars (' ', spaces/2);
    print_chars ('*', star_count);
    print_chars (' ', spaces/2);

    printf("%\n");
    star_count += pointing_up ? 2 : -2;
  }
}

int main (void)
{
  print_triangle(7, 4, false);
  print_triangle(7, 4, true);
}

Note that the above code will behave strange if the triangle's base isn't in sync with its height - I left that out intentionally, feel free to improve the program further with such.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.