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I'm curious about calling class methods and whether there is any difference between:

class Jt
  class << self
    def say_hello
      puts "I want to say hello"
    end
  end
end

class Jt2
  def self.say_hello
    puts "2 want to say hello"
  end
end

Jt.say_hello
Jt2.say_hello

Is it just style or is there any difference in how ruby handle these? I always use the latter for Rails stuff but tend to see the former in meta-programming or Rails source code.

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marked as duplicate by sawa, Alex Wayne, eugen, Uri Agassi, Ashwini Agarwal Apr 11 '14 at 9:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Hmm... so that question + answer seems to be how? from a user point of view which I get (I think). I guess I'm just wondering if they are truly equivalent in terms of performance, resources etc... And whether one should be preferred over the other for non-stylistic reasons. –  timpone Apr 24 '13 at 19:23
1  
@sawa This question NOT a duplicate of that other one you linked to. That question is asking why "eigenclass" is different from "class"; that question is not talking about two different ways to define a method. –  David Grayson Apr 24 '13 at 19:26
    
@DavidGrayson You are right. The question that I linked to is related but is not the same. –  sawa Apr 24 '13 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the difference between those is just style. They both add a method to the singleton class of the class. Here is what I did with your code to investigate it:

class Jt
  class << self
    def say_hello
      puts "I want to say hello"
    end
  end
end

class Jt2
  def self.say_hello
    puts "2 want to say hello"
  end
end

p Jt.singleton_class.instance_method(:say_hello)   # => #<UnboundMethod: #<Class:Jt>#say_hello>
p Jt2.singleton_class.instance_method(:say_hello)  # => #<UnboundMethod: #<Class:Jt2>#say_hello>

In case it matters, I used JRuby.

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thx, my hunch is you're right and just stylistic. Just getting to know Ruby and would love to see if there was a deeper reason as the class method syntax seems ubiquitous in userspace apps while the eigenclass method seems pretty ubiquitous in frameworks, libraries, etc... –  timpone Apr 24 '13 at 19:34
    
It is not just style. calling << self involves more steps and uses more resource. When you define a method within << self, the same method is defined in two different places. You can notice the difference by using set_trace_func. –  sawa Apr 24 '13 at 19:42
    
thx @sawa , that seems logical but isn't it then surprising that it is the chosen way for writing libraries and frameworks. Not trying to be argumentative just trying to understand. –  timpone Apr 24 '13 at 19:44
    
@timpone If you care about the resource, the latter way is better. But then, you have to repeat self. every time. Using << self is (slightly more) resource consuming, but the programmer does not have to repeat self.. That is why some people chose that way. –  sawa Apr 24 '13 at 19:47
    
thx both to David and @sawa for input. Feel more confident that these are functionally equivalent. –  timpone Apr 24 '13 at 20:09
class << self
    def say_hello
      puts "I want to say hello"
    end
end
  • is a singleton class inside class Jt.

Here is more informationWhat's the difference between a class and the singleton of that class in Ruby? and Look here Singleton class in Ruby

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