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there is example that shows that using RAII this way

class File_ptr{
//...
   File* p;
   int* i; 
   public:
      File_ptr(const char* n, const char* s){
         i=new int[100];
         p=fopen(n,a); // imagine fopen might throws
      }
      ~File_ptr(){fclose(p);}
}

void use_file(const char* fn){
    File_ptr(fn,"r");
}

is safe. but my question is: what if there is exception thrown in p=fopen(n,a); then memory allocated to i is not returned. Is this right to assume that RAII tells you then each time you want X to be safe then all resources aquired by X must be allocated on stack? And if X.a is being created then resources of a must also be placed on stack? and again, and again, I mean finally if there is some resource placed on heap how it could be handled with RAII? If it is not mine class i.e.

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4  
Separate your concerns, have one resource managing class per resource and one class aggregating managed resources. –  Charles Bailey Apr 24 '13 at 19:12
6  
fopen is a C function so it won't throw any exception because C doesn't have exception –  Caesar Apr 24 '13 at 19:13
    
it is example, imagine it throws –  user2316968 Apr 24 '13 at 19:14
1  
The fix is to change int* i to something like std::vector<int> i. That is, to use RAII. –  David Schwartz Apr 24 '13 at 19:15
    
If you had a function that throws an exception you have two options handle the exception or keep throwing it up. Its fine to have a constructor that throws. –  andre Apr 24 '13 at 19:16
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Treating this as an intellectual exercise where you don't want to use std::vector, you need to divide your classes up so they have a single responsibility. Here's my "integer array" class. Its responsibility is to manage the memory for an integer array.

class IntArray {
public:
    IntArray() : ptr_(new int[100]) {}
    ~IntArray() { delete[] ptr_; }
    IntArray(const IntArray&) = delete; // making copyable == exercise for reader
    IntArray& operator=(const IntArray&) = delete;
    // TODO: accessor?
private:
    int* ptr_;
};

Here is my file handling class. Its responsibility is to manage a FILE*.

class FileHandle {
public:
    FileHandle(const char* name, const char* mode)
     : fp_(fopen(name, mode))
    {
        if (fp_ == 0)
            throw std::runtime_error("Failed to open file");
    }
    ~FileHandle() {
        fclose(fp_); // squelch errors
    }
    FileHandle(const FileHandle&) = delete;
    FileHandle& operator=(const FileHandle&) = delete;
    // TODO: accessor?
private:
    FILE* fp_;
};

Note, that I convert my construction error to an exception; fp_ being a valid file pointer is an invariant that I wish to maintain so I abort construction if I cannot set this invariant up.

Now, makeing File_ptr exception safe is easy and the class needs no complex resource management.

class File_ptr {
private:
    FileHandle p;
    IntArray i; 
public:
    File_ptr(const char* n, const char* s)
     : p(n, s)
     , i()
    {}
};

Note the lack of any user-declared destructor, copy assignment operator or copy constructor. I can swap the order of the members and in either case it doesn't matter which constructor throws.

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thanks. what if in your File_ptr class constructor i() throws? destructor ~IntArray() for vaiable File_ptr.i will be called because it is on stack, no matter than constructor failed and it is not considered initialized? is it considered constructed though? I have seen that constructor must return to consider object as created –  user2316968 Apr 25 '13 at 12:48
    
@authority: If IntArray() throws during the construction of i then p will be cleaned up as the first part of stack unwinding. (Because the initialization of i is ordered after the initialization of p, we know that p must have been successfully initialized by the time the initialization of i throws an exception. This means that p can and must be cleaned up.) –  Charles Bailey Apr 25 '13 at 13:00
    
yes, and my question is what with memory allocated by IntArray, delete[]ptr_ is not called then. And in generall this is again same case: IntArray should be constructed like File_ptr to allocate on stack, so objects are for sure deleted even when it throws, right? I mean at the last end I never escpape from doing something that will not be deleted (unless I use try(){}catch() ofcourse) –  user2316968 Apr 25 '13 at 13:04
    
please explain me this, this is essence of my question –  user2316968 Apr 25 '13 at 13:06
    
@authority: There is no memory allocated by IntArray in that situation; it threw an exception! That is why it is so fundamentally important to have you resource managing classes manage one resource each. –  Charles Bailey Apr 25 '13 at 13:14
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The whole point of RAII is to NOT assign any resources (like the int-array) to dangling pointers. Instead, use std::vector or assign the array pointer to something like std::unique_ptr. This way the resources will be destroyed as exceptions occur.

And no, you don't have to use STL, but to make use of RAII, the lowest base-resources (like heap allocated arrays) have to be created using RAII as well and the easiest way to do this is to use STL rather than writing your own smart-pointer or vectors.

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Unfortunately the standard library doesn't provide any RAII facilities except for memory. They should have at least included something for files. –  Mark Ransom Apr 24 '13 at 22:05
1  
Well std::fstream does just that. But one could argue that a stream is not exactly the same as a simple filehandle. With C++11, threading based objects like mutex and lock are added. But yeah, STL is a bit lacking in comparison to other frameworks. It's more like a best practice-collection of extended core language features. –  Excelcius Apr 24 '13 at 22:16
1  
As an aside, you probably have never used the STL, which is the name of the library that inspired many features of the std library. –  Yakk Apr 25 '13 at 17:25
    
@Yakk: You're right, how come I have never heard of that. But it seems STL is used very often as a synonym for the std-library since std-library is in fact a std-named, template-based, library. Besides, OP mentioned STL in one of the comments. –  Excelcius Apr 25 '13 at 17:31
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if exception happen after the new, you have to catch the exception and delete the pointer in the constructor then re-throw in this case, the destructor will not be called since the object is never constructed.

otherwise if i is a std::vector, it will clean up automatically

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I know vector solves it, but RAII is not dependent on stl. What in general case –  user2316968 Apr 24 '13 at 19:18
1  
@authority in the general case, use one RAII object per resource. Vectors are just one example of such a type. –  Mike Seymour Apr 24 '13 at 19:30
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One way to handle this is to put everything that might be invalidated by an exception into a local variable which itself uses RAII, then assign to your members at the end when it's safe.

class File_ptr{
//...
   File* p;
   int* i; 
   public:
      File_ptr(const char* n, const char* s) i(NULL), p(NULL) {
         unique_ptr<int> temp_i=new int[100];  // might throw std::bad_alloc
         p=fopen(n,a); // imagine fopen might throws
         // possibility of throwing an exception is over, safe to set members now
         i = temp_i.release();
      }
      ~File_ptr(){fclose(p);}
}

For more information see Exception Safety.

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If you know it throws, put it in a try-catch.

File_ptr(const char* n, const char* s) {
    i=new int[100];
    try {
        p=fopen(n,a); // imagine fopen might throws
    } catch(...) {
         delete[] i;
         throw;
    }
}
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I think the original exception should be rethrown. –  robson3.14 Apr 24 '13 at 19:56
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File_ptr(const char* n, const char* s)
{
  std::unique_ptr<int[]> sp(new int[100]);
  p = fopen(n, s);
  i = sp.release();
}
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