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Is it possible to view when push operations have been performed on a repository, and in particular on Github?

We have a build environment (Jenkins) which automatically builds our product upon various events:

  • When a user pushes new commits on Github
  • Every night
  • Upon user request

I would like to be able to determine which exact commit has been used to build those packages (builds are eventually automatically deleted in Jenkins, so I cant' rely on Jenkins build), knowing that I have the date and time of the build.

While most of the time, I can just look up in git, sometimes, a developer has made changes and has commited them locally, but has not pushed those on github. When later he pushes his changes, it becomes impossible to tell what source code was used to build a package.

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Good question. I don't think there's a way to tell much about the push operations, especially things like who did the push since it doesn't have to be the same user as the commit author. Would be nice if git remotes had a push history log. –  Jorge Orpinel Sep 11 at 16:22

3 Answers 3

Hmm i think the easiest way is to make it with Jenkins.

You can set different notification methods for Jenkins. There can see every commit. We use it with a XMPP extension its very helpful. But for this you have to run jenkins.

Otherwise you have to build a hook which sends you an E-Mail when something push to your repository.

http://git-scm.com/book/en/Customizing-Git-Git-Hooks

There is a section for E-Mail Workflow Hooks.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually, I found out that the Jenkins Git plugin automatically sets the following environment variables that can then be used within build scripts:

GIT_COMMIT - SHA of the current
GIT_BRANCH - Name of the branch currently being used, e.g. "master" or "origin/foo"
GIT_PREVIOUS_COMMIT - SHA of the previous built commit from the same branch (the current SHA on first build in branch)
GIT_URL - Repository remote URL
GIT_URL_N - Repository remote URLs when there are more than 1 remotes, e.g. GIT_URL_1, GIT_URL_2
GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL - Committer/Author Email
GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL - Committer/Author Email

Simply referencing the GIT_COMMIT environment variable was sufficient to track down the compiled and packaged code.

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Seems possible to track push with Github's Repo Hooks API, I haven't used them though.

For a non-github git repo:

In case it is not bare, .git/logs/refs/heads/<branch name> records when a branch got updated, possibly by git push. ( note: The file get pruned in some cases. )

Not sure how to directly check this in bare repo, as they don't maintain reflogs. I would have a look at git hooks if I have to keep track of this.

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