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I would like to take the following lists:

matrix1 = [
[1, 2, 3, 4],
[5, 6, 7, 8],
[9, 10, 11, 12]
]

matrix2 = [
[A, B, C, D],
[E, F, G, H]
]

and combine them into:

new_matrix = [
[A, B, C, D],
[E, F, G, H],
[1, 2, 3, 4],
[5, 6, 7, 8],
[9, 10, 11, 12]
]

And I can't seem to figure out a good method. Insert() puts the whole list in, resulting in a list of lists of lists. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

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marked as duplicate by Aprillion, grc, Tilo, madth3, Jean-Bernard Pellerin Apr 25 '13 at 4:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just ADD them!

new_matrix = matrix1 + matrix2
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Well don't I feel stupid. Thanks :) –  user2238685 Apr 24 '13 at 23:17

Use + to add them:

In [59]: new_matrix = matrix2 + matrix1

In [60]: new_matrix
Out[60]: 
[['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'],
 ['E', 'F', 'G', 'H'],
 [1, 2, 3, 4],
 [5, 6, 7, 8],
 [9, 10, 11, 12]]
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use extend it extends the list with another rather than inserting it inside.

>>> matrix2.extend(matrix1)

However, this will make the changes in place rather than creating a new list, which might be what you want. If you would rather create a new one, then + is what you need.

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2  
+1, It's worth noting that, while this is correct, the OP shows a new variable holding the values, while this modifies the list in-place. It obviously depends which is wanted. –  Lattyware Apr 24 '13 at 20:49
    
@Lattyware thanks for noting that. I have updated the answer to make that clear. –  Meitham Apr 24 '13 at 20:52

Just use the + operator

>>> a = [[1],[2],[3]]
>>> b = [[4],[5],[6]]
>>> a+b
[[1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]]
>>> 
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Generic solutions for many lists:

Either:

new_matrix = list(itertools.chain(matrix1, matrix2, matrix3, ...)

Or:

new_matrix = sum(matrix1, matrix2, matrix3, ..., default=[])

Or with a list of lists:

new_matrix = list(itertools.chain(*matrices)

Or:

new_matrix = sum(*matrices, default=[])
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1  
    
@Lattyware: please specify what part of that is recommending against this in the case of wanting a list as an endresult? The OP isn't asking for an iterable, is he? –  Wolph Apr 24 '13 at 20:52
    
@Lattyware: would you prefer list(itertools.chain(*matrices)) instead? –  Wolph Apr 24 '13 at 20:53
    
Yes, a list is an iterable like any other, itertools.chain() is the better solution for it. As to getting a list out, as you have stated, the conversion to a list is easy - if it's necessary. –  Lattyware Apr 24 '13 at 20:53
    
@Lattyware: I repeat the question, where does it say that itertools.chain is recommended over sum if you want to make a list?` It says that there are good alternatives, that does not imply that the former is wrong... –  Wolph Apr 24 '13 at 20:57

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